Coverart for item
The Resource Water Policy and Governance in Canada

Water Policy and Governance in Canada

Label
Water Policy and Governance in Canada
Title
Water Policy and Governance in Canada
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Renzetti, Steven
Dewey number
333.9100971
LC call number
K3581-3598.22GE170HC
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Dupont, Diane P
Series statement
Global Issues in Water Policy Ser.
Series volume
v.17
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Sustainable development
Label
Water Policy and Governance in Canada
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro -- Dedication -- Foreword -- References -- Contents -- Contributors -- Part I: Introduction and Background -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Background and Objectives -- 1.2 Contents of Volume -- 1.3 Major Policy Issues Addressed in Volume -- 1.3.1 Institutional Fragmentation -- 1.3.2 First Nations and Water -- 1.3.3 Economic Dimensions of Water -- 1.3.4 Transboundary Issues and Canadian Water Management in International Context -- 1.3.5 Emerging Issues and Policy Responses -- References -- Chapter 2: The Hydrological and Policy Contexts for Water in Canada -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Hydrological Context -- 2.2.1 Water Quantity -- 2.2.2 Water Use -- 2.2.3 Water Quality -- 2.2.4 Flooding -- 2.2.5 Wetlands -- 2.2.6 Drought -- 2.2.7 Permafrost -- 2.3 Policy Context -- 2.3.1 Role of Different Levels of Government -- 2.3.2 Disengagement by the Federal Government -- 2.3.3 Water as a Human Right -- 2.4 Implications -- References -- Chapter 3: Water Policy in Canada -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Scope and Dimensions of the Water Allocation Decision -- 3.3 Attributes of Water Allocation Policies -- 3.4 Current Water Allocation Practices in Canada -- 3.5 Challenges for Effective Water Allocation -- References -- Chapter 4: Changing Currents: A Case Study in the Evolution of Water Law in Western Canada -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Water Jurisdiction and Allocation Systems in Canada -- 4.2.1 Jurisdiction Over Water -- 4.2.2 Water Allocation Systems and How They Work in Canada -- 4.3 The Origins of Western Water Law-Foundational Principles in the Current Context -- 4.4 Critiques of Western Water Law -- 4.5 The Evolution of Water Law-A Case Study in British Columbia -- 4.5.1 British Columbia's New Water Sustainability Act -- 4.5.2 Contested Crown Ownership -- 4.5.3 First in Time, First in Right (FITFIR) "Off-ramps"
  • 4.5.4 Incentives for Efficiency and Water Sustainability Planning -- 4.5.5 Water for Nature -- 4.6 Changing Currents-Toward a Twenty-first Century Approach -- References -- Chapter 5: Reconciliation and Relationality in Water Research and Management in Canada: Implementing Indigenous Ontologies, Epistemologies, and Methodologies -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Storm Clouds on the Horizon: A Brief Introduction to 500+ Years of Indigenous-Settler Relations -- 5.3 Sandbagging Knowledge: Barriers to Integrative Approaches to Water Research and Management -- 5.4 Skimming the Surface: What the Literature Tells Us -- 5.5 Diving Deeper: Indigenous and Western Water Knowledge-Holders Tell Us More -- 5.5.1 We Need to Challenge the Dichotomy Discourse -- 5.5.2 We Need to Acknowledge That Power Dynamics Exist -- 5.5.3 We Need to Develop Awareness About Indigenous Rights and Indigenous Responsibilities -- 5.5.4 We Need Innovative Strategies to Effectively Implement Integrative Water Research and Management -- 5.6 Tacking Left, Tacking Right, and Coming About: Policy Implications -- 5.7 When Two Waters Meet, Tides Can Turn: Policy Recommendations -- 5.8 As Long as the Rivers Flow : Concluding Comments -- References -- Part II: International and Transboundary -- Chapter 6: Placing Canada's Water Policies in an International Context -- 6.1 Context of Water Management -- 6.1.1 Growth of IWRM -- 6.1.2 Emergence of Water-Energy-Food Nexus -- 6.2 A Historical Perspective on Canada's Water Management -- 6.2.1 National Water Management in a Federal Environment -- 6.2.2 Provincial Lead in Water Management -- 6.2.3 Canada's Interface with US -- 6.3 Comparative Analysis of Water Management and Governance -- 6.3.1 Water Management in Large Developed Countries -- 6.3.1.1 United States of America -- 6.3.1.2 Brazil -- 6.3.1.3 Analysis
  • 6.3.2 Advanced Water Management in European Context -- 6.3.2.1 Germany -- 6.3.2.2 The Netherlands -- 6.3.2.3 Analysis -- 6.3.3 Management of Water in Water-Scarce Countries -- 6.3.3.1 Jordan -- 6.3.3.2 South Africa -- 6.3.3.3 Analysis -- 6.4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 7: Water Security and Adaptation to Climate Extremes in Transboundary Rivers of North America -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Climate Change and Difficult Hydrology in North America -- 7.2.1 Difficulty Hydrology and Extreme Climate Events -- 7.3 Adaptation -- 7.3.1 Water-Related Adaptation in a Transboundary Context -- 7.3.2 The Special Challenge of Adaptation in Federal Political Systems -- 7.4 North America as a Laboratory for Transboundary Adaptation -- 7.4.1 Colorado -- 7.4.2 Columbia -- 7.4.3 Rio Grande -- 7.5 Lesson from Adaptation to Climate Extremes in Transboundary Rivers -- 7.5.1 Proportional Allocation Rules -- 7.5.2 Water Markets and Efficiency Improvements -- 7.5.3 Multi-Layered Planning and Conflict Resolution -- 7.5.4 Subsidiarity -- 7.6 Pathways to Water Security and Transboundary Adaptation in Federal Rivers: Implications for Canada and Future Research -- References -- Chapter 8: Transcending Borders Through Postcolonial Water Governance? Indigenous Water Governance Across the Canada-US Border -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 The Boundary Waters Treaty, the International Joint Commission, and Binational Cooperation -- 8.2.1 The Boundary Waters Treaty: The Tug of War between Sovereign Reach and Duty to Cooperate -- 8.2.2 The IJC's Transition from Binational to Participatory -- 8.3 Indigenous-Led Transboundary Water Governance: Legal and Historical Context -- 8.3.1 Indigenous Water Governance in Canada -- 8.3.2 Indigenous Water Rights in the US -- 8.4 Emerging Trends in Indigenous-Led Transboundary Water Governance Across the Canada-US Border
  • 8.4.1 The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council -- 8.4.2 Connection to Place -- 8.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: The Great Lakes, Water Quality and Water Policy in Canada -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Great Lakes Water Policy and Governance: The Transboundary Policy Context -- 9.2.1 Historical Context -- 9.2.2 Decline and Re-Engagement? -- 9.3 Assessing Canadian Water Policy Using the Great Lakes Case -- 9.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part III: Economics -- Chapter 10: Water Valuation -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.1.1 Types of Values: Market and Non-Market Values -- 10.1.1.1 Market Value -- 10.1.1.2 Non-Market Values -- 10.1.2 Non-Market Valuation Methods -- 10.1.3 How Is Total Economic Value Used? -- 10.1.4 Water and Values -- 10.2 Canada's Experience with Using Water Values -- 10.2.1 International and Federal Level Experiences -- 10.2.2 Provincial Experiences -- 10.2.3 Municipal Governments (or Local Agencies) -- 10.3 Gaps/Weaknesses -- References -- Chapter 11: Water Pricing in Canada -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Background -- 11.3 Provincial Water Pricing -- 11.3.1 Assessment -- 11.3.2 Innovations -- 11.4 Municipal Water Pricing -- 11.4.1 Assessment -- 11.4.2 Innovations -- 11.5 Future Trends -- References -- Part IV: Politics and Governance/Management -- Chapter 12: The Politics of Water Policy Development in Canada -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Water Policy Development as Pluralism -- 12.3 Political Power in Policy Development -- 12.4 The Economic Power of Water User Groups -- 12.5 The Historical Advantages of Water User Groups -- 12.6 The Institutional Power of Water User Groups -- 12.7 The Political Power of Environmentalists and First Nations -- 12.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Coordinating Water Policies: Necessary, But Not Sufficient -- 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Canada's Approach to Water Policy Coordination Relative to the World -- 13.3 Challenging Underlying Assumptions -- 13.3.1 Drinking Water Provision on First Nations Communities -- 13.3.2 Algal Blooms in Lake Erie -- 13.4 Rethinking Water Policy Coordination -- 13.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: Managing the Fraser River Basin -- 14.1 Context and Background -- 14.2 The Fraser River Basin -- 14.3 Management of the Fraser River Basin -- 14.3.1 Water Governance -- 14.3.2 River Basin Management -- 14.3.3 Fraser River Estuary Management Program -- 14.3.4 Fraser River Action Plan -- 14.3.5 Fraser Basin Management Program -- 14.3.6 Fraser Basin Council Society -- 14.4 Fraser Basin Council -- 14.4.1 Fraser Basin Council Programs -- 14.4.1.1 Britannia Mine Remediation -- 14.4.1.2 Fraser Salmon and Watersheds -- 14.4.1.3 Flood Hazard Management -- 14.4.1.4 Sustainable Communities -- 14.4.1.5 Sustainability Indicators -- 14.4.1.6 Aboriginal Engagement -- 14.5 Collaborative Watershed Governance in BC -- 14.5.1 Enabling Policy Framework -- 14.5.2 Organizational Design -- 14.5.3 Capacity and Resources -- 14.5.4 Other Success Factors -- 14.6 A Final Thought{u2026} -- References -- Chapter 15: Indigenizing Water Governance in Canada -- 15.1 Water Rich, Yet Governance Challenged -- 15.2 Water Governance in Canada Today -- 15.2.1 The Problems of Jurisdictional Fragmentation -- 15.2.2 Fragmented Governance and Indigenous People in Canada -- 15.3 New Water Governance Research -- 15.3.1 Advances in Water governance -- 15.3.2 Governments and Good Governance -- 15.3.3 Indigenous Peoples of Canada in Profile -- 15.3.4 Indigenous Worldviews and Decision Drivers -- 15.3.5 What Does Water Mean to Indigenous Peoples? -- 15.3.6 The Links from Water to Worldviews -- 15.4 Challenges for Good Water Governance: Three Examples
  • 15.4.1 Water Challenges for Indigenous Communities in Canada
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC4731235
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (451 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319428062
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC4731235
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL4731235
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11293316
  • (CaONFJC)MIL968478
  • (OCoLC)961910162
Label
Water Policy and Governance in Canada
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro -- Dedication -- Foreword -- References -- Contents -- Contributors -- Part I: Introduction and Background -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Background and Objectives -- 1.2 Contents of Volume -- 1.3 Major Policy Issues Addressed in Volume -- 1.3.1 Institutional Fragmentation -- 1.3.2 First Nations and Water -- 1.3.3 Economic Dimensions of Water -- 1.3.4 Transboundary Issues and Canadian Water Management in International Context -- 1.3.5 Emerging Issues and Policy Responses -- References -- Chapter 2: The Hydrological and Policy Contexts for Water in Canada -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Hydrological Context -- 2.2.1 Water Quantity -- 2.2.2 Water Use -- 2.2.3 Water Quality -- 2.2.4 Flooding -- 2.2.5 Wetlands -- 2.2.6 Drought -- 2.2.7 Permafrost -- 2.3 Policy Context -- 2.3.1 Role of Different Levels of Government -- 2.3.2 Disengagement by the Federal Government -- 2.3.3 Water as a Human Right -- 2.4 Implications -- References -- Chapter 3: Water Policy in Canada -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Scope and Dimensions of the Water Allocation Decision -- 3.3 Attributes of Water Allocation Policies -- 3.4 Current Water Allocation Practices in Canada -- 3.5 Challenges for Effective Water Allocation -- References -- Chapter 4: Changing Currents: A Case Study in the Evolution of Water Law in Western Canada -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Water Jurisdiction and Allocation Systems in Canada -- 4.2.1 Jurisdiction Over Water -- 4.2.2 Water Allocation Systems and How They Work in Canada -- 4.3 The Origins of Western Water Law-Foundational Principles in the Current Context -- 4.4 Critiques of Western Water Law -- 4.5 The Evolution of Water Law-A Case Study in British Columbia -- 4.5.1 British Columbia's New Water Sustainability Act -- 4.5.2 Contested Crown Ownership -- 4.5.3 First in Time, First in Right (FITFIR) "Off-ramps"
  • 4.5.4 Incentives for Efficiency and Water Sustainability Planning -- 4.5.5 Water for Nature -- 4.6 Changing Currents-Toward a Twenty-first Century Approach -- References -- Chapter 5: Reconciliation and Relationality in Water Research and Management in Canada: Implementing Indigenous Ontologies, Epistemologies, and Methodologies -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Storm Clouds on the Horizon: A Brief Introduction to 500+ Years of Indigenous-Settler Relations -- 5.3 Sandbagging Knowledge: Barriers to Integrative Approaches to Water Research and Management -- 5.4 Skimming the Surface: What the Literature Tells Us -- 5.5 Diving Deeper: Indigenous and Western Water Knowledge-Holders Tell Us More -- 5.5.1 We Need to Challenge the Dichotomy Discourse -- 5.5.2 We Need to Acknowledge That Power Dynamics Exist -- 5.5.3 We Need to Develop Awareness About Indigenous Rights and Indigenous Responsibilities -- 5.5.4 We Need Innovative Strategies to Effectively Implement Integrative Water Research and Management -- 5.6 Tacking Left, Tacking Right, and Coming About: Policy Implications -- 5.7 When Two Waters Meet, Tides Can Turn: Policy Recommendations -- 5.8 As Long as the Rivers Flow : Concluding Comments -- References -- Part II: International and Transboundary -- Chapter 6: Placing Canada's Water Policies in an International Context -- 6.1 Context of Water Management -- 6.1.1 Growth of IWRM -- 6.1.2 Emergence of Water-Energy-Food Nexus -- 6.2 A Historical Perspective on Canada's Water Management -- 6.2.1 National Water Management in a Federal Environment -- 6.2.2 Provincial Lead in Water Management -- 6.2.3 Canada's Interface with US -- 6.3 Comparative Analysis of Water Management and Governance -- 6.3.1 Water Management in Large Developed Countries -- 6.3.1.1 United States of America -- 6.3.1.2 Brazil -- 6.3.1.3 Analysis
  • 6.3.2 Advanced Water Management in European Context -- 6.3.2.1 Germany -- 6.3.2.2 The Netherlands -- 6.3.2.3 Analysis -- 6.3.3 Management of Water in Water-Scarce Countries -- 6.3.3.1 Jordan -- 6.3.3.2 South Africa -- 6.3.3.3 Analysis -- 6.4 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 7: Water Security and Adaptation to Climate Extremes in Transboundary Rivers of North America -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Climate Change and Difficult Hydrology in North America -- 7.2.1 Difficulty Hydrology and Extreme Climate Events -- 7.3 Adaptation -- 7.3.1 Water-Related Adaptation in a Transboundary Context -- 7.3.2 The Special Challenge of Adaptation in Federal Political Systems -- 7.4 North America as a Laboratory for Transboundary Adaptation -- 7.4.1 Colorado -- 7.4.2 Columbia -- 7.4.3 Rio Grande -- 7.5 Lesson from Adaptation to Climate Extremes in Transboundary Rivers -- 7.5.1 Proportional Allocation Rules -- 7.5.2 Water Markets and Efficiency Improvements -- 7.5.3 Multi-Layered Planning and Conflict Resolution -- 7.5.4 Subsidiarity -- 7.6 Pathways to Water Security and Transboundary Adaptation in Federal Rivers: Implications for Canada and Future Research -- References -- Chapter 8: Transcending Borders Through Postcolonial Water Governance? Indigenous Water Governance Across the Canada-US Border -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 The Boundary Waters Treaty, the International Joint Commission, and Binational Cooperation -- 8.2.1 The Boundary Waters Treaty: The Tug of War between Sovereign Reach and Duty to Cooperate -- 8.2.2 The IJC's Transition from Binational to Participatory -- 8.3 Indigenous-Led Transboundary Water Governance: Legal and Historical Context -- 8.3.1 Indigenous Water Governance in Canada -- 8.3.2 Indigenous Water Rights in the US -- 8.4 Emerging Trends in Indigenous-Led Transboundary Water Governance Across the Canada-US Border
  • 8.4.1 The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council -- 8.4.2 Connection to Place -- 8.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: The Great Lakes, Water Quality and Water Policy in Canada -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Great Lakes Water Policy and Governance: The Transboundary Policy Context -- 9.2.1 Historical Context -- 9.2.2 Decline and Re-Engagement? -- 9.3 Assessing Canadian Water Policy Using the Great Lakes Case -- 9.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part III: Economics -- Chapter 10: Water Valuation -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.1.1 Types of Values: Market and Non-Market Values -- 10.1.1.1 Market Value -- 10.1.1.2 Non-Market Values -- 10.1.2 Non-Market Valuation Methods -- 10.1.3 How Is Total Economic Value Used? -- 10.1.4 Water and Values -- 10.2 Canada's Experience with Using Water Values -- 10.2.1 International and Federal Level Experiences -- 10.2.2 Provincial Experiences -- 10.2.3 Municipal Governments (or Local Agencies) -- 10.3 Gaps/Weaknesses -- References -- Chapter 11: Water Pricing in Canada -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Background -- 11.3 Provincial Water Pricing -- 11.3.1 Assessment -- 11.3.2 Innovations -- 11.4 Municipal Water Pricing -- 11.4.1 Assessment -- 11.4.2 Innovations -- 11.5 Future Trends -- References -- Part IV: Politics and Governance/Management -- Chapter 12: The Politics of Water Policy Development in Canada -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Water Policy Development as Pluralism -- 12.3 Political Power in Policy Development -- 12.4 The Economic Power of Water User Groups -- 12.5 The Historical Advantages of Water User Groups -- 12.6 The Institutional Power of Water User Groups -- 12.7 The Political Power of Environmentalists and First Nations -- 12.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Coordinating Water Policies: Necessary, But Not Sufficient -- 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Canada's Approach to Water Policy Coordination Relative to the World -- 13.3 Challenging Underlying Assumptions -- 13.3.1 Drinking Water Provision on First Nations Communities -- 13.3.2 Algal Blooms in Lake Erie -- 13.4 Rethinking Water Policy Coordination -- 13.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: Managing the Fraser River Basin -- 14.1 Context and Background -- 14.2 The Fraser River Basin -- 14.3 Management of the Fraser River Basin -- 14.3.1 Water Governance -- 14.3.2 River Basin Management -- 14.3.3 Fraser River Estuary Management Program -- 14.3.4 Fraser River Action Plan -- 14.3.5 Fraser Basin Management Program -- 14.3.6 Fraser Basin Council Society -- 14.4 Fraser Basin Council -- 14.4.1 Fraser Basin Council Programs -- 14.4.1.1 Britannia Mine Remediation -- 14.4.1.2 Fraser Salmon and Watersheds -- 14.4.1.3 Flood Hazard Management -- 14.4.1.4 Sustainable Communities -- 14.4.1.5 Sustainability Indicators -- 14.4.1.6 Aboriginal Engagement -- 14.5 Collaborative Watershed Governance in BC -- 14.5.1 Enabling Policy Framework -- 14.5.2 Organizational Design -- 14.5.3 Capacity and Resources -- 14.5.4 Other Success Factors -- 14.6 A Final Thought{u2026} -- References -- Chapter 15: Indigenizing Water Governance in Canada -- 15.1 Water Rich, Yet Governance Challenged -- 15.2 Water Governance in Canada Today -- 15.2.1 The Problems of Jurisdictional Fragmentation -- 15.2.2 Fragmented Governance and Indigenous People in Canada -- 15.3 New Water Governance Research -- 15.3.1 Advances in Water governance -- 15.3.2 Governments and Good Governance -- 15.3.3 Indigenous Peoples of Canada in Profile -- 15.3.4 Indigenous Worldviews and Decision Drivers -- 15.3.5 What Does Water Mean to Indigenous Peoples? -- 15.3.6 The Links from Water to Worldviews -- 15.4 Challenges for Good Water Governance: Three Examples
  • 15.4.1 Water Challenges for Indigenous Communities in Canada
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC4731235
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (451 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319428062
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC4731235
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL4731235
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11293316
  • (CaONFJC)MIL968478
  • (OCoLC)961910162

Library Locations

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      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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