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The Resource The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen : Believing in Universal Law

The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen : Believing in Universal Law

Label
The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen : Believing in Universal Law
Title
The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen
Title remainder
Believing in Universal Law
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
von Bernstorff, Jochen
Dewey number
341.01
LC call number
KZ3375.K45 B47 2010
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1959-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Dunlap, Thomas
Series statement
Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law
Series volume
v.68
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Electronic books. -- local
  • International law -- History
  • Kelsen, Hans, -- 1881-1973
Label
The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen : Believing in Universal Law
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Part I: The quest for objectivity: the method and construction of universal law -- 1 Method and construction of international law in nineteenth-century German scholarship -- A Kaltenborn and the "objective principle" of international law -- I The "subjective principle" in Kant and Hegel -- II Humanity as a "community of law" [Rechtsgemeinwesen] in Kaltenborn -- B Bergbohm and Fricker: "The problem of international law revisited" -- C Jellinek as synthesis -- I The free will of the state as the formal ground of all law -- II The concept of "self-obligation" [Selbstverpflichtung] and the obligatory nature of public law -- III The theory of the guaranteed norm -- IV Jellinek's "objective international law" -- 1 The "nature of the thing" [Natur der Sache] as a principle of objectification -- 2 "Shared interests" and "purpose of the state" as the final sociological foundation of objective international law -- D Heinrich Triepel and the "common will" [Gemeinwille] as a principle of objectivization -- Conclusion -- 2 Kelsenian formalism as critical methodology in international law -- A A new methodological tool kit -- I Methodological dualism as the starting point -- II Methodological critique through the "identity thesis" -- III The anti-ideological thrust of the new methodology -- B. The function of the critical methodology: law as a universal medium for shaping society -- I. Volk, nation, and state in international law -- II Law as a universal medium of societal change -- C The fundamental critique of the conceptual apparatus of international law -- I. The conceptual uncoupling of the notion of sovereignty from the "state as a legal person of will" [willensfähige Staatsperson] -- 1 Critique of the conception of sovereignty as a core stock of state competencies
  • 2 Sovereignty as a hierarchy-creating, ordering element of the legal system -- II The critique of the doctrine of self-obligation -- III The critique of a dualism of state law and international law -- 1 A critique of the duality of sources -- 2 A critique of the duality of regulatory objects -- D The opponents of the critical method: Kelsen's abstract conceptual world as a "radical-logicistic metaphysics" -- 3 An "objective" architecture of international law: Kelsen, Kunz, and Verdross -- A Constructing a unitary system -- I Systemic unity as an epistemological postulate -- II "Delegation" as a unity-creating structural principle -- III The idea of unity in the discourse on international law -- B International law as law endowed with the power of coercion -- I Central compulsion and the "world state trap" [Weltstaatsfalle] -- II Reprisals and war as decentralized means of coercion -- III The coercive character as an evolutionary achievement -- C The primacy thesis: the construction of an international law above the state -- I The delimitation of the state's spheres of competence through international law -- II The primacy thesis and the problem of norm conflicts -- III The defense and further development of the primacy thesis -- IV The primacy thesis, domestic jurisdiction, and the decisions of the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ) -- D The quarrel over the choice hypothesis [Wahlhypothese] -- E The opponents of the construction of a universal law and the notion of the "world state" -- I Universal law, the "world state," and the civitas maxima -- II The universal system of law as natural law? -- III The abuse of the idea of universalism -- Part II: The outlines of the cosmopolitan project - the actors, sources, and courts of universal law -- 4 The new actors of universal law -- A Legally organized communities above the state
  • I Unions of states as a dynamic continuum of legal integration -- 1 Unions of states as a particular international legal community -- 2 The doctrine of centralization and decentralization -- 3 Sovereignty as the state's direct subordination to international law [Völkerrechtsunmittelbarkeit] -- II The legal nature of the League of Nations -- 1 The League of Nations as a personi.ed sub-order of international law -- 2 The League of Nations as a community of joint ownership [Gemeinschaft zur gesamten Hand] -- III The opponents of an "integration-friendly" theory of international law -- B The individual -- I Positive law -- II The critique of Scelle and Politis -- C Universal law as a dynamic system of integration -- 5 Legal sources as universal instruments of law-creation -- A Sources beyond metaphysics and consensus -- I The critique of metaphysical dualism -- II The critique of the positivist consensus model -- III The hypothetical character of international law: the basic norm of international law -- B The legal sources of international law and the hierarchical structure of the law -- I Customary law -- 1 Dispensing with the opinio iuris -- 2 The replacement for the opinio iuris -- II An objective doctrine of treaties -- 1 The creation of the treaty-based legal order -- 2 The international treaty's mode of action -- C The theory of legal sources as a self-limitation of legal scholarship -- D The opponents of a "dematerialized" doctrine of legal sources -- I Rematerialization as a strategy of revision -- II Pure Theory of Law and the "unjust" status quo -- III Replacing the ideal of justice with the ideal of peace -- 6 The international judiciary as the functional center of universal law -- A Peace through compulsory jurisdiction -- I The politico-legal approach: the Permanent League for the Maintenance of Peace
  • II The socio-historical approach: compulsory jurisdiction as a necessary step toward a centralized, universal legal system -- III The doctrinal approach: the fundamental critique of the doctrinal limitation on the judicial function in international relations -- B The theoretical classification of the judicial decision -- I The function of the judicial decision within the hierarchical structure of the law -- II The nature of judicial decision-making -- III The postulate of compulsory jurisdiction as the consequence of a system-oriented conception of the law -- C Realist opposition to the quest for a strong international judiciary: compulsory jurisdiction as another "distinguished international lawyer's dream" -- 7 The role of the international legal scholar after Kelsen - a concluding reflection -- Postscript - on Kelsenian formalism in international law* (2010) -- A The structure and limits of Kelsenian formalism in international law -- I Formalism as a quest for objectivity -- II International legal scholarship as a transcendental system of formal concepts -- III The limits of objectivity -- IV Formalism as creative destruction: the cosmopolitan project -- B The continuing relevance of Kelsenian formalism in international law -- I Formalism and morality -- II Formalism and realism - Hans Kelsen, Carl Schmitt, and the Weimar constellation -- III The belief in systemic unity of international law in the age of fragmentation. -- C Conclusion - from Kelsen to reflexive formalism in international law -- CAREER SKETCHES: HANS KELSEN, ALFRED VERDROSS, AND JOSEF LAURENZ KUNZ -- Hans Kelsen (1881-1973) -- The period before and during the First World War - education and scholarly imprinting in the Austrian monarchy (1881-1919) -- After the war - Kelsen as professor and constitutional court judge in Vienna (1919-1933)
  • Emigration experiences - Kelsen in Geneva and the United States (1933-1973) -- Alfred Verdross (1890-1980) -- Josef Laurenz Kunz (1890-1970) -- Bibliography -- Abbreviations -- Part I Hans Kelsen's writings (in chronological order) -- Part II -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC542907
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (344 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780511773884
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC542907
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL542907
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10433610
  • (OCoLC)692156958
Label
The Public International Law Theory of Hans Kelsen : Believing in Universal Law
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Part I: The quest for objectivity: the method and construction of universal law -- 1 Method and construction of international law in nineteenth-century German scholarship -- A Kaltenborn and the "objective principle" of international law -- I The "subjective principle" in Kant and Hegel -- II Humanity as a "community of law" [Rechtsgemeinwesen] in Kaltenborn -- B Bergbohm and Fricker: "The problem of international law revisited" -- C Jellinek as synthesis -- I The free will of the state as the formal ground of all law -- II The concept of "self-obligation" [Selbstverpflichtung] and the obligatory nature of public law -- III The theory of the guaranteed norm -- IV Jellinek's "objective international law" -- 1 The "nature of the thing" [Natur der Sache] as a principle of objectification -- 2 "Shared interests" and "purpose of the state" as the final sociological foundation of objective international law -- D Heinrich Triepel and the "common will" [Gemeinwille] as a principle of objectivization -- Conclusion -- 2 Kelsenian formalism as critical methodology in international law -- A A new methodological tool kit -- I Methodological dualism as the starting point -- II Methodological critique through the "identity thesis" -- III The anti-ideological thrust of the new methodology -- B. The function of the critical methodology: law as a universal medium for shaping society -- I. Volk, nation, and state in international law -- II Law as a universal medium of societal change -- C The fundamental critique of the conceptual apparatus of international law -- I. The conceptual uncoupling of the notion of sovereignty from the "state as a legal person of will" [willensfähige Staatsperson] -- 1 Critique of the conception of sovereignty as a core stock of state competencies
  • 2 Sovereignty as a hierarchy-creating, ordering element of the legal system -- II The critique of the doctrine of self-obligation -- III The critique of a dualism of state law and international law -- 1 A critique of the duality of sources -- 2 A critique of the duality of regulatory objects -- D The opponents of the critical method: Kelsen's abstract conceptual world as a "radical-logicistic metaphysics" -- 3 An "objective" architecture of international law: Kelsen, Kunz, and Verdross -- A Constructing a unitary system -- I Systemic unity as an epistemological postulate -- II "Delegation" as a unity-creating structural principle -- III The idea of unity in the discourse on international law -- B International law as law endowed with the power of coercion -- I Central compulsion and the "world state trap" [Weltstaatsfalle] -- II Reprisals and war as decentralized means of coercion -- III The coercive character as an evolutionary achievement -- C The primacy thesis: the construction of an international law above the state -- I The delimitation of the state's spheres of competence through international law -- II The primacy thesis and the problem of norm conflicts -- III The defense and further development of the primacy thesis -- IV The primacy thesis, domestic jurisdiction, and the decisions of the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ) -- D The quarrel over the choice hypothesis [Wahlhypothese] -- E The opponents of the construction of a universal law and the notion of the "world state" -- I Universal law, the "world state," and the civitas maxima -- II The universal system of law as natural law? -- III The abuse of the idea of universalism -- Part II: The outlines of the cosmopolitan project - the actors, sources, and courts of universal law -- 4 The new actors of universal law -- A Legally organized communities above the state
  • I Unions of states as a dynamic continuum of legal integration -- 1 Unions of states as a particular international legal community -- 2 The doctrine of centralization and decentralization -- 3 Sovereignty as the state's direct subordination to international law [Völkerrechtsunmittelbarkeit] -- II The legal nature of the League of Nations -- 1 The League of Nations as a personi.ed sub-order of international law -- 2 The League of Nations as a community of joint ownership [Gemeinschaft zur gesamten Hand] -- III The opponents of an "integration-friendly" theory of international law -- B The individual -- I Positive law -- II The critique of Scelle and Politis -- C Universal law as a dynamic system of integration -- 5 Legal sources as universal instruments of law-creation -- A Sources beyond metaphysics and consensus -- I The critique of metaphysical dualism -- II The critique of the positivist consensus model -- III The hypothetical character of international law: the basic norm of international law -- B The legal sources of international law and the hierarchical structure of the law -- I Customary law -- 1 Dispensing with the opinio iuris -- 2 The replacement for the opinio iuris -- II An objective doctrine of treaties -- 1 The creation of the treaty-based legal order -- 2 The international treaty's mode of action -- C The theory of legal sources as a self-limitation of legal scholarship -- D The opponents of a "dematerialized" doctrine of legal sources -- I Rematerialization as a strategy of revision -- II Pure Theory of Law and the "unjust" status quo -- III Replacing the ideal of justice with the ideal of peace -- 6 The international judiciary as the functional center of universal law -- A Peace through compulsory jurisdiction -- I The politico-legal approach: the Permanent League for the Maintenance of Peace
  • II The socio-historical approach: compulsory jurisdiction as a necessary step toward a centralized, universal legal system -- III The doctrinal approach: the fundamental critique of the doctrinal limitation on the judicial function in international relations -- B The theoretical classification of the judicial decision -- I The function of the judicial decision within the hierarchical structure of the law -- II The nature of judicial decision-making -- III The postulate of compulsory jurisdiction as the consequence of a system-oriented conception of the law -- C Realist opposition to the quest for a strong international judiciary: compulsory jurisdiction as another "distinguished international lawyer's dream" -- 7 The role of the international legal scholar after Kelsen - a concluding reflection -- Postscript - on Kelsenian formalism in international law* (2010) -- A The structure and limits of Kelsenian formalism in international law -- I Formalism as a quest for objectivity -- II International legal scholarship as a transcendental system of formal concepts -- III The limits of objectivity -- IV Formalism as creative destruction: the cosmopolitan project -- B The continuing relevance of Kelsenian formalism in international law -- I Formalism and morality -- II Formalism and realism - Hans Kelsen, Carl Schmitt, and the Weimar constellation -- III The belief in systemic unity of international law in the age of fragmentation. -- C Conclusion - from Kelsen to reflexive formalism in international law -- CAREER SKETCHES: HANS KELSEN, ALFRED VERDROSS, AND JOSEF LAURENZ KUNZ -- Hans Kelsen (1881-1973) -- The period before and during the First World War - education and scholarly imprinting in the Austrian monarchy (1881-1919) -- After the war - Kelsen as professor and constitutional court judge in Vienna (1919-1933)
  • Emigration experiences - Kelsen in Geneva and the United States (1933-1973) -- Alfred Verdross (1890-1980) -- Josef Laurenz Kunz (1890-1970) -- Bibliography -- Abbreviations -- Part I Hans Kelsen's writings (in chronological order) -- Part II -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC542907
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (344 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780511773884
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC542907
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL542907
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10433610
  • (OCoLC)692156958

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