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The Resource What hedge funds really do : an introduction to portfolio management, Philip J. Romero and Tucker Balch, (electronic resource)

What hedge funds really do : an introduction to portfolio management, Philip J. Romero and Tucker Balch, (electronic resource)

Label
What hedge funds really do : an introduction to portfolio management
Title
What hedge funds really do
Title remainder
an introduction to portfolio management
Statement of responsibility
Philip J. Romero and Tucker Balch
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • Annotation
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • What do hedge funds really do? These lightly regulated funds continually innovate new investing and trading strategies to take advantage of temporary mispricing of assets (when their market price deviates from their intrinsic value). These techniques are shrouded in mystery, which permits hedge fund managers to charge exceptionally high fees. While the details of each fund's approach are carefully guarded trade secrets, this book draws the curtain back on the core building blocks of many hedge fund strategies
  • Annotation:
Member of
Cataloging source
CaBNVSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Romero, Philip J
Dewey number
332.6327
LC call number
HG4530
LC item number
.R658 2014
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Balch, Tucker
Series statement
Economics collection,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hedge funds
  • Portfolio management
Summary expansion
  • When I managed a hedge fund in the late 1990s, computer-based trading was a mysterious technique only available to the largest hedge funds and institutional trading desks. We've come a long way since then. With this book, Drs. Romero and Balch lift the veil from many of these once-opaque concepts in high-tech finance. We can all benefit from learning how the cooperation between wetware and software creates fitter models. This book does a fantastic job describing how the latest advances in financial modeling and data science help today's portfolio managers solve these greater riddles. -Michael Himmel, Managing Partner, Essex Asset Management I applaud Phil Romero's willingness to write about the hedge fund world, an industry that is very private, often flamboyant, and easily misunderstood. As with every sector of the investment landscape, the hedge fund industry varies dramatically from quantitative "black box" technology, to fundamental research and old-fashioned stock picking. This book helps investors distinguish between these diverse opposites and understand their place in the new evolving world of finance. -Mick Elfers, Founder and Chief Investment Strategist, Irvington Capital
  • When I managed a hedge fund in the late 1990s, computer-based trading was a mysterious technique only available to the largest hedge funds and institutional trading desks. We've come a long way since then. With this book, Drs. Romero and Balch lift the veil from many of these once-opaque concepts in high-tech finance. We can all benefit from learning how the cooperation between wetware and software creates fitter models. This book does a fantastic job describing how the latest advances in financial modeling and data science help today's portfolio managers solve these greater riddles. -Michael Himmel, Managing Partner, Essex Asset Management I applaud Phil Romero's willingness to write about the hedge fund world, an industry that is very private, often flamboyant, and easily misunderstood. As with every sector of the investment landscape, the hedge fund industry varies dramatically from quantitative "black box" technology, to fundamental research and old-fashioned stock picking. This book helps investors distinguish between these diverse opposites and understand their place in the new evolving world of finance. -Mick Elfers, Founder and Chief Investment Strategist, Irvington Capital
Label
What hedge funds really do : an introduction to portfolio management, Philip J. Romero and Tucker Balch, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Includes index
  • Part of: 2014 digital library
Contents
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001540820
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition.
Isbn
9781631570896
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001540820
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader
Label
What hedge funds really do : an introduction to portfolio management, Philip J. Romero and Tucker Balch, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
  • Includes index
  • Part of: 2014 digital library
Contents
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
  • Part I. The basics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. So you want to be a hedge fund manager -- 3. An illustrative hedge fund strategy: arbitrage -- 4. Market-making mechanics -- 5. Introduction to company valuation -- Part II. Investing fundamentals: CAPM and EMH -- 6. How valuation is used by hedge funds -- 7. Framework for investing: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) -- 8. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH), its three versions -- 9. The fundamental law of active portfolio management -- Part III. Market simulation and portfolio construction -- 10. Modern portfolio theory: the efficient frontier and portfolio optimization -- 11. Event studies -- 12. Overcoming data quirks to design trading strategies -- 13. Data sources -- 14. Back testing strategies -- Part IV. Case study and issues -- 15. Hedge fund case study: long term capital management (LTCM) -- 16. Opportunities and challenges for hedge funds -- Teaching cases -- Glossary -- Summary -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001540820
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition.
Isbn
9781631570896
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001540820
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader

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