Coverart for item
The Resource Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :

Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :

Label
Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :
Title
Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
Dewey number
345.42
LC call number
KD7863.99
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Unlocking the Law
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Criminal law -- England
  • Criminal law -- Great Britain
  • Criminal law -- Wales
Label
Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Guide to the book -- Preface -- Table of cases -- Table of statutes and other instruments -- PART 1 CONCEPTS IN CRIMINAL LAW -- 1 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW -- 1.1 Purpose of criminal law -- 1.1.1 Should the law enforce moral values? -- 1.1.2 Example of the changing nature of criminal law -- 1.2 Sources of criminal law -- 1.2.1 Common law offences -- 1.2.2 Statutory offences -- 1.2.3 Codification of the criminal law -- 1.2.4 Reform of the law -- 1.3 Defining a crime -- 1.3.1 Conduct criminalised by the judges -- 1.3.2 Retroactive effect of case law -- 1.4 Classification of offences -- 1.4.1 Classifying law by its source -- 1.4.2 Categories for purposes of police detention -- 1.4.3 Classifying by the type of harm caused by the crime -- 1.4.4 Classification by where a case will be tried -- 1.5 Criminal justice system -- 1.5.1 Trials in the Magistrates' Court -- 1.5.2 Trials in the Crown Court -- 1.5.3 Appeals from the Magistrates' Court -- 1.5.4 Appeals from trials in the Crown Court -- 1.5.5 The hierarchy of the courts -- 1.6 Sentencing -- 1.6.1 Purposes of sentencing -- 1.7 Elements of a crime -- 1.8 Burden and standard of proof -- 1.8.1 Presumption of innocence -- 1.8.2 Raising a defence -- 1.8.3 Standard of proof -- 1.9 Criminal law and human rights -- 1.9.1 The right to a fair trial -- 1.9.2 Burden of proof -- 1.9.3 No punishment without law -- 1.9.4 Other human rights -- 1.9.5 Human rights and criminal procedure -- 2 ACTUS REUS -- 2.1 The physical element -- 2.1.1 Conduct and consequences -- 2.1.2 Circumstances -- 2.1.3 The physical element alone is not a crime -- 2.1.4 Omissions -- 2.2 Voluntary conduct -- 2.3 Omissions -- 2.3.1 Commission by omission -- 2.3.2 Imposition of a duty of care -- 2.3.3 Breach of duty to act -- 2.3.4 Reform -- 2.4 Causation -- 2.4.1 Factual causation
  • 2.4.2 Legal causation -- 3 MENS REA -- 3.1 The mental element -- 3.2 Intention -- 3.2.1 Direct intention -- 3.2.2 Oblique intention -- 3.3 Recklessness -- 3.3.1 The Cunningham test -- 3.3.2 The Caldwell years: 1981-2003 -- 3.3.3 Back to Cunningham : G and another -- 3.4 Negligence -- 3.5 Dishonesty -- 3.6 Transferred malice -- 3.7 Coincidence of actus reus and mens rea -- 4 STRICT LIABILITY -- 4.1 Absolute liability -- 4.2 Strict liability -- 4.2.1 No due diligence defence -- 4.2.2 No defence of mistake -- 4.2.3 Summary of strict liability -- 4.3 Common law strict liability offences -- 4.4 Statutory strict liability offences -- 4.4.1 The presumption of mens rea -- 4.4.2 The Gammon criteria -- 4.4.3 Looking at the wording of an Act -- 4.4.4 Quasi-criminal offences -- 4.4.5 Strict liability and human rights -- 4.4.6 Issues of social concern -- 4.4.7 Promoting enforcement of the law -- 4.4.8 Recent cases -- 4.5 Justification for strict liability -- 4.5.1 Arguments against strict liability -- 4.6 Proposals for reform -- 5 PARTIES TO A CRIME -- 5.1 Principal offenders -- 5.1.1 Difficulties in identifying the principal -- 5.2 Innocent agents -- 5.3 Secondary parties -- 5.3.1 Actus reus of secondary parties: aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring -- 5.3.2 Mens rea of secondary parties -- 5.3.3 Joint enterprise -- 5.4 Withdrawal from participation -- 5.4.1 Pre-planned criminal activity -- 5.4.2 Spontaneous criminal activity -- 5.5 Assisting an offender -- 5.6 Reform -- 6 INCHOATE OFFENCES -- 6.1 Inchoate offences -- 6.2 Attempt -- 6.2.1 Actus reus of attempt -- 6.2.2 Mens rea of attempt -- 6.2.3 Impossibility -- 6.2.4 Excluded offences -- 6.2.5 Successful attempts -- 6.2.6 Reform -- 6.3 Conspiracy -- 6.3.1 Actus reus of statutory conspiracy -- 6.3.2 Mens rea of statutory conspiracy -- 6.3.3 Common law conspiracy -- 6.3.4 Impossibility
  • 6.4 Assisting or encouraging crime -- 6.4.1 Background -- 6.4.2 Liability under the Serious Crime Act 2007 -- 6.4.3 Actus reus elements -- 6.4.4 Mens Rea elements -- 6.4.5 No requirement for substantive offence to be committed (s 49) -- 6.4.6 Defence of 'acting reasonably' (s 50) -- 6.4.7 Defence for victims (s 51) -- 6.4.8 Impossibility -- 6.4.9 Attempts liability -- 6.4.10 Evaluation of the Serious Crime Act 2007 -- 7 CAPACITY -- 7.1 Children -- 7.1.1 Children under the age of 10 -- 7.1.2 Child safety orders -- 7.1.3 Children aged 10 and over -- 7.2 Mentally ill persons -- 7.2.1 Unfitness to plead -- 7.2.2 Insanity at time of offence -- 7.2.3 Diminished responsibility -- 7.2.4 Sentencing mentally ill offenders -- 7.3 Vicarious liability -- 7.3.1 Extended meaning of words -- 7.3.2 Delegation principle -- 7.3.3 Reasons for vicarious liability -- 7.3.4 Criticisms of vicarious liability -- 7.4 Corporate liability -- 7.4.1 Exceptions to the general rule of liability -- 7.4.2 The principle of identification -- 7.4.3 Vicarious liability -- 7.4.4 Breach of statutory duty -- 7.5 Corporate manslaughter -- 7.5.1 Previous law -- 7.5.2 Reform of corporate manslaughter -- 7.5.3 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 -- 7.5.4 Why make organisations criminally liable for manslaughter? -- 8 GENERAL DEFENCES -- 8.1 Duress -- 8.1.1 Sources of the duress -- 8.1.2 The seriousness of the threat -- 8.1.3 Threats against whom? -- 8.1.4 Imminence of the threat, opportunities to escape and police protection -- 8.1.5 Duress does not exist in the abstract -- 8.1.6 Voluntary exposure to risk of compulsion -- 8.1.7 Should D have resisted the threats? -- 8.1.8 The scope of the defence -- 8.1.9 The development of duress of circumstances -- 8.2 Necessity -- 8.3 Marital coercion -- 8.4 Mistake -- 8.4.1 Mistakes of fact -- 8.4.2 Mistakes of law -- 8.5 Self-defence
  • 8.5.1 The necessity of force -- 8.5.2 The reasonableness of force -- 8.5.3 Intoxication, mistake and self-defence -- 8.5.4 Section 76 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 -- 8.6 Consent -- 8.6.1 Consent must be real -- 8.6.2 Consent and fraud -- 8.6.3 The scope of consent -- 8.6.4 The impact of the European Convention on Human Rights (1950) and the Human Rights Act 1998 -- 9 MENTAL CAPACITY DEFENCES -- 9.1 Insanity -- 9.1.1 Procedure -- 9.1.2 The special verdict -- 9.1.3 The M'Naghten Rules -- 9.1.4 Situations not covered by the Rules -- 9.1.5 Reform -- 9.2 Automatism -- 9.2.1 What is automatism? -- 9.2.2 The need for an evidential foundation -- 9.2.3 Extent of involuntariness required -- 9.2.4 Self-induced automatism -- 9.2.5 Reflex actions -- 9.2.6 Reform -- 9.3 Intoxication -- 9.3.1 Intoxication is no defence if D still formed mens rea -- 9.3.2 Involuntary intoxication -- 9.3.3 Voluntary intoxication -- 9.3.4 'Dutch courage' -- 9.3.5 Intoxication and insanity -- 9.3.6 Intoxication and automatism -- 9.3.7 Intoxicated mistakes -- 9.3.8 Reform -- PART 2 SPECIFIC OFFENCES -- 10 HOMICIDE -- 10.1 Actus reus of homicide -- 10.1.1 Human being: birth -- 10.1.2 Human being: death -- 10.1.3 Under the King or Queen's peace -- 10.1.4 Within any county of the realm -- 10.1.5 The year and a day rule -- 10.2 Murder -- 10.2.1 Intention -- 10.2.2 Grievous bodily harm -- 10.2.3 Procedure in murder trials -- 10.3 Voluntary manslaughter -- 10.3.1 Diminished responsibility -- 10.3.2 Loss of self-control -- 10.3.3 Suicide pacts -- 10.4 Involuntary manslaughter -- 10.4.1 Constructive manslaughter -- 10.4.2 Gross negligence manslaughter -- 10.4.3 Reckless manslaughter -- 10.4.4 Reform -- 10.5 Causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult -- 10.6 Causing death by dangerous driving -- 10.7 Infanticide -- 10.8 Offences against a foetus
  • 10.8.1 Child destruction -- 10.8.2 Procuring a miscarriage -- 10.9 Reform of the law of homicide -- 10.9.1 The structure of homicide offences -- 10.9.2 First degree murder -- 10.9.3 Second degree murder -- 10.9.4 Manslaughter -- 10.9.5 Intention -- 10.9.6 Duress -- 10.9.7 A single offence of criminal homicide? -- 11 NON-FATAL OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON -- 11.1. Common assault -- 11.1.1 Actus reus of assault -- 11.1.2 Actus reus of battery -- 11.1.3 Mens rea of assault and battery -- 11.2 Section 47 -- 11.2.1 Actus reus of section 47 -- 11.2.2 Mens rea of section 47 -- 11.2.3 Consent and section 47 -- 11.3 Section 20 -- 11.3.1 Actus reus of section 20 -- 11.3.2 Mens rea of section 20 -- 11.4 Section 18 -- 11.4.1 Actus reus of section 18 -- 11.4.2 Mens rea of section 18 -- 11.5 Reform -- 11.6 Racially or religiously aggravated assaults -- 11.7 Administering poison -- 11.7.1 Administer -- 11.7.2 Noxious thing -- 11.7.3 Maliciously -- 12 SEXUAL OFFENCES -- 12.1 Rape -- 12.1.1 Penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth of another person, with the penis -- 12.1.2 The absence of consent -- 12.1.3 Intent to penetrate -- 12.1.4 Lack of reasonable belief -- 12.1.5 The marital exception to rape -- 12.1.6 Women as defendants -- 12.2 Assault by penetration -- 12.3 Sexual assault -- 12.4 Rape and other offences against children under 13 -- 12.5 Sexual activity with a child -- 12.6 Incest -- 12.6.1 'Sexual activity with a child family member' -- 12.6.2 'Sex with an adult relative' -- 12.6.3 Sex with an adult relative: consenting to penetration -- 12.7 Other crimes under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 -- 13 THEFT -- 13.1 Background -- 13.1.1 Theft -- 13.1.2 The elements of theft -- 13.2 Appropriation -- 13.2.1 Assumption of the rights of an owner -- 13.2.2 Consent to the appropriation -- 13.2.3 The decision in Gomez -- 13.2.4 Consent without deception
  • 13.2.5 Appropriation of credit balances
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC615872
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (537 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781444127973
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC615872
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL615872
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr-1
  • (OCoLC)795119200
Label
Unlocking Criminal Law, Third Edition :
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Guide to the book -- Preface -- Table of cases -- Table of statutes and other instruments -- PART 1 CONCEPTS IN CRIMINAL LAW -- 1 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW -- 1.1 Purpose of criminal law -- 1.1.1 Should the law enforce moral values? -- 1.1.2 Example of the changing nature of criminal law -- 1.2 Sources of criminal law -- 1.2.1 Common law offences -- 1.2.2 Statutory offences -- 1.2.3 Codification of the criminal law -- 1.2.4 Reform of the law -- 1.3 Defining a crime -- 1.3.1 Conduct criminalised by the judges -- 1.3.2 Retroactive effect of case law -- 1.4 Classification of offences -- 1.4.1 Classifying law by its source -- 1.4.2 Categories for purposes of police detention -- 1.4.3 Classifying by the type of harm caused by the crime -- 1.4.4 Classification by where a case will be tried -- 1.5 Criminal justice system -- 1.5.1 Trials in the Magistrates' Court -- 1.5.2 Trials in the Crown Court -- 1.5.3 Appeals from the Magistrates' Court -- 1.5.4 Appeals from trials in the Crown Court -- 1.5.5 The hierarchy of the courts -- 1.6 Sentencing -- 1.6.1 Purposes of sentencing -- 1.7 Elements of a crime -- 1.8 Burden and standard of proof -- 1.8.1 Presumption of innocence -- 1.8.2 Raising a defence -- 1.8.3 Standard of proof -- 1.9 Criminal law and human rights -- 1.9.1 The right to a fair trial -- 1.9.2 Burden of proof -- 1.9.3 No punishment without law -- 1.9.4 Other human rights -- 1.9.5 Human rights and criminal procedure -- 2 ACTUS REUS -- 2.1 The physical element -- 2.1.1 Conduct and consequences -- 2.1.2 Circumstances -- 2.1.3 The physical element alone is not a crime -- 2.1.4 Omissions -- 2.2 Voluntary conduct -- 2.3 Omissions -- 2.3.1 Commission by omission -- 2.3.2 Imposition of a duty of care -- 2.3.3 Breach of duty to act -- 2.3.4 Reform -- 2.4 Causation -- 2.4.1 Factual causation
  • 2.4.2 Legal causation -- 3 MENS REA -- 3.1 The mental element -- 3.2 Intention -- 3.2.1 Direct intention -- 3.2.2 Oblique intention -- 3.3 Recklessness -- 3.3.1 The Cunningham test -- 3.3.2 The Caldwell years: 1981-2003 -- 3.3.3 Back to Cunningham : G and another -- 3.4 Negligence -- 3.5 Dishonesty -- 3.6 Transferred malice -- 3.7 Coincidence of actus reus and mens rea -- 4 STRICT LIABILITY -- 4.1 Absolute liability -- 4.2 Strict liability -- 4.2.1 No due diligence defence -- 4.2.2 No defence of mistake -- 4.2.3 Summary of strict liability -- 4.3 Common law strict liability offences -- 4.4 Statutory strict liability offences -- 4.4.1 The presumption of mens rea -- 4.4.2 The Gammon criteria -- 4.4.3 Looking at the wording of an Act -- 4.4.4 Quasi-criminal offences -- 4.4.5 Strict liability and human rights -- 4.4.6 Issues of social concern -- 4.4.7 Promoting enforcement of the law -- 4.4.8 Recent cases -- 4.5 Justification for strict liability -- 4.5.1 Arguments against strict liability -- 4.6 Proposals for reform -- 5 PARTIES TO A CRIME -- 5.1 Principal offenders -- 5.1.1 Difficulties in identifying the principal -- 5.2 Innocent agents -- 5.3 Secondary parties -- 5.3.1 Actus reus of secondary parties: aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring -- 5.3.2 Mens rea of secondary parties -- 5.3.3 Joint enterprise -- 5.4 Withdrawal from participation -- 5.4.1 Pre-planned criminal activity -- 5.4.2 Spontaneous criminal activity -- 5.5 Assisting an offender -- 5.6 Reform -- 6 INCHOATE OFFENCES -- 6.1 Inchoate offences -- 6.2 Attempt -- 6.2.1 Actus reus of attempt -- 6.2.2 Mens rea of attempt -- 6.2.3 Impossibility -- 6.2.4 Excluded offences -- 6.2.5 Successful attempts -- 6.2.6 Reform -- 6.3 Conspiracy -- 6.3.1 Actus reus of statutory conspiracy -- 6.3.2 Mens rea of statutory conspiracy -- 6.3.3 Common law conspiracy -- 6.3.4 Impossibility
  • 6.4 Assisting or encouraging crime -- 6.4.1 Background -- 6.4.2 Liability under the Serious Crime Act 2007 -- 6.4.3 Actus reus elements -- 6.4.4 Mens Rea elements -- 6.4.5 No requirement for substantive offence to be committed (s 49) -- 6.4.6 Defence of 'acting reasonably' (s 50) -- 6.4.7 Defence for victims (s 51) -- 6.4.8 Impossibility -- 6.4.9 Attempts liability -- 6.4.10 Evaluation of the Serious Crime Act 2007 -- 7 CAPACITY -- 7.1 Children -- 7.1.1 Children under the age of 10 -- 7.1.2 Child safety orders -- 7.1.3 Children aged 10 and over -- 7.2 Mentally ill persons -- 7.2.1 Unfitness to plead -- 7.2.2 Insanity at time of offence -- 7.2.3 Diminished responsibility -- 7.2.4 Sentencing mentally ill offenders -- 7.3 Vicarious liability -- 7.3.1 Extended meaning of words -- 7.3.2 Delegation principle -- 7.3.3 Reasons for vicarious liability -- 7.3.4 Criticisms of vicarious liability -- 7.4 Corporate liability -- 7.4.1 Exceptions to the general rule of liability -- 7.4.2 The principle of identification -- 7.4.3 Vicarious liability -- 7.4.4 Breach of statutory duty -- 7.5 Corporate manslaughter -- 7.5.1 Previous law -- 7.5.2 Reform of corporate manslaughter -- 7.5.3 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 -- 7.5.4 Why make organisations criminally liable for manslaughter? -- 8 GENERAL DEFENCES -- 8.1 Duress -- 8.1.1 Sources of the duress -- 8.1.2 The seriousness of the threat -- 8.1.3 Threats against whom? -- 8.1.4 Imminence of the threat, opportunities to escape and police protection -- 8.1.5 Duress does not exist in the abstract -- 8.1.6 Voluntary exposure to risk of compulsion -- 8.1.7 Should D have resisted the threats? -- 8.1.8 The scope of the defence -- 8.1.9 The development of duress of circumstances -- 8.2 Necessity -- 8.3 Marital coercion -- 8.4 Mistake -- 8.4.1 Mistakes of fact -- 8.4.2 Mistakes of law -- 8.5 Self-defence
  • 8.5.1 The necessity of force -- 8.5.2 The reasonableness of force -- 8.5.3 Intoxication, mistake and self-defence -- 8.5.4 Section 76 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 -- 8.6 Consent -- 8.6.1 Consent must be real -- 8.6.2 Consent and fraud -- 8.6.3 The scope of consent -- 8.6.4 The impact of the European Convention on Human Rights (1950) and the Human Rights Act 1998 -- 9 MENTAL CAPACITY DEFENCES -- 9.1 Insanity -- 9.1.1 Procedure -- 9.1.2 The special verdict -- 9.1.3 The M'Naghten Rules -- 9.1.4 Situations not covered by the Rules -- 9.1.5 Reform -- 9.2 Automatism -- 9.2.1 What is automatism? -- 9.2.2 The need for an evidential foundation -- 9.2.3 Extent of involuntariness required -- 9.2.4 Self-induced automatism -- 9.2.5 Reflex actions -- 9.2.6 Reform -- 9.3 Intoxication -- 9.3.1 Intoxication is no defence if D still formed mens rea -- 9.3.2 Involuntary intoxication -- 9.3.3 Voluntary intoxication -- 9.3.4 'Dutch courage' -- 9.3.5 Intoxication and insanity -- 9.3.6 Intoxication and automatism -- 9.3.7 Intoxicated mistakes -- 9.3.8 Reform -- PART 2 SPECIFIC OFFENCES -- 10 HOMICIDE -- 10.1 Actus reus of homicide -- 10.1.1 Human being: birth -- 10.1.2 Human being: death -- 10.1.3 Under the King or Queen's peace -- 10.1.4 Within any county of the realm -- 10.1.5 The year and a day rule -- 10.2 Murder -- 10.2.1 Intention -- 10.2.2 Grievous bodily harm -- 10.2.3 Procedure in murder trials -- 10.3 Voluntary manslaughter -- 10.3.1 Diminished responsibility -- 10.3.2 Loss of self-control -- 10.3.3 Suicide pacts -- 10.4 Involuntary manslaughter -- 10.4.1 Constructive manslaughter -- 10.4.2 Gross negligence manslaughter -- 10.4.3 Reckless manslaughter -- 10.4.4 Reform -- 10.5 Causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult -- 10.6 Causing death by dangerous driving -- 10.7 Infanticide -- 10.8 Offences against a foetus
  • 10.8.1 Child destruction -- 10.8.2 Procuring a miscarriage -- 10.9 Reform of the law of homicide -- 10.9.1 The structure of homicide offences -- 10.9.2 First degree murder -- 10.9.3 Second degree murder -- 10.9.4 Manslaughter -- 10.9.5 Intention -- 10.9.6 Duress -- 10.9.7 A single offence of criminal homicide? -- 11 NON-FATAL OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON -- 11.1. Common assault -- 11.1.1 Actus reus of assault -- 11.1.2 Actus reus of battery -- 11.1.3 Mens rea of assault and battery -- 11.2 Section 47 -- 11.2.1 Actus reus of section 47 -- 11.2.2 Mens rea of section 47 -- 11.2.3 Consent and section 47 -- 11.3 Section 20 -- 11.3.1 Actus reus of section 20 -- 11.3.2 Mens rea of section 20 -- 11.4 Section 18 -- 11.4.1 Actus reus of section 18 -- 11.4.2 Mens rea of section 18 -- 11.5 Reform -- 11.6 Racially or religiously aggravated assaults -- 11.7 Administering poison -- 11.7.1 Administer -- 11.7.2 Noxious thing -- 11.7.3 Maliciously -- 12 SEXUAL OFFENCES -- 12.1 Rape -- 12.1.1 Penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth of another person, with the penis -- 12.1.2 The absence of consent -- 12.1.3 Intent to penetrate -- 12.1.4 Lack of reasonable belief -- 12.1.5 The marital exception to rape -- 12.1.6 Women as defendants -- 12.2 Assault by penetration -- 12.3 Sexual assault -- 12.4 Rape and other offences against children under 13 -- 12.5 Sexual activity with a child -- 12.6 Incest -- 12.6.1 'Sexual activity with a child family member' -- 12.6.2 'Sex with an adult relative' -- 12.6.3 Sex with an adult relative: consenting to penetration -- 12.7 Other crimes under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 -- 13 THEFT -- 13.1 Background -- 13.1.1 Theft -- 13.1.2 The elements of theft -- 13.2 Appropriation -- 13.2.1 Assumption of the rights of an owner -- 13.2.2 Consent to the appropriation -- 13.2.3 The decision in Gomez -- 13.2.4 Consent without deception
  • 13.2.5 Appropriation of credit balances
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC615872
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (537 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781444127973
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC615872
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL615872
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr-1
  • (OCoLC)795119200

Library Locations

    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
Processing Feedback ...