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The Resource Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany

Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany

Label
Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany
Title
Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Walter, Christian
Dewey number
254.80940000000001
LC call number
KJC5527.T736 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Ungern-Sternberg, Antje von
Series statement
Schriften zum Religionsrecht
Series volume
v.4
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Religion and state--Great Britain
Label
Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany - Introduction -- Contents -- A. Historical Development -- I. THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS IN ENGLAND - Augur Pearce -- 1. Introduction -- (a) Ecclesial state or established church? -- (b) The Brandenburg comparison -- 2. The middle ages - 597-1532 -- 3. Reformation to Revolution - 1532-1688 -- (a) Chronology of the Period -- (b) The Legislation of the 1530s -- (c) The ecclesial State -- (d) Private initiative in conformity with the public religion -- (e) Alternative religion - the penal laws -- (f) The universality of the public religion -- (g) Electoral Brandenburg - Territorial religious autonomy -- (h) Electoral Brandenburg - Doctrinal basis of the public religion -- (i) Electoral Brandenburg - Vehicles of ecclesiastical oversight -- (j) Electoral Brandenburg - limiting the princely prerogative -- 4. The »long eighteenth century± - 1688-1828 -- (a) Prelude - The return of the Jews -- (b) Chronology of the Period -- (c) The Coronation Oath, the Bill of Rights and the principle of parliamentary consent -- (d) The Toleration Act 1689 -- (aa) Individual alternative religion -- (bb) Alternative congregations and their preachers -- (cc) Religious societies -- (dd) Alternative religious trusts -- (ee) Privileges of alternative religion -- (e) Later developments affecting alternative religion -- (f) The universality of the public religion -- (g) Brandenburg-Prussia - The harmonisation of a patchwork of laws of religion -- (h) Brandenburg-Prussia - The legal position of Catholicism -- (i) Brandenburg-Prussia - Institutional expression of a »State± role in relation to religion -- 5. The »displaced nineteenth century± - 1828-1920 -- (a) Chronology of the Period -- (b) Voluntary religion - registration, fiscal privileges, and marriage
  • (c) Non-Christian religions and Non-religion -- (d) Continuing inequalities -- (e) Schools: a private religious initative -- (f) The Tractarian reaction -- (g) The voluntary face of the Church of England -- (h) Separation of Prussian protestant rules and structures from government agencies and the general law -- (i) Stricter and narrower - the Prussian churches under the later Hohenzollern -- 6. The mid- and late twentieth century - 1920-2000 -- (a) The fate of public religion in Wales -- (b) The two faces of the Church of England -- (c) Public religion and the law of marriage and gender -- (d) Private religion - statute aiding ecumenism -- (e) Private religion - the issue of ministerial discipline -- (f) Public and private religion - dialogue and partnership with government -- (g) Private non-Christian religion -- (h) Prussian religion under the Constitutions of 1919-20 -- 7. The new millennium - 2000-10 -- (a) Human rights »brought home± -- (b) Human rights and public religion -- (c) Equality law, civil partnership and the public services debate -- (d) Latest developments -- (e) Conclusion -- II. TRANSFORMATION OF CHURCH RELATIONS - THE SCANDINAVIAN EXPERIENCE - Lars Friedner -- 1. Sweden -- 2. Norway -- 3. Denmark -- 4. Conclusions -- B. Interactions between Religious and Secular Law -- III. LEGAL PROTECTION IN ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS - Mark Hill -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Church of England Courts -- (a) Chancellors -- (b) Registrars -- (c) Consistory courts -- (d) Appellate courts -- (e) The Court of Faculties -- (f) Judicial review -- 3. Muslim Courts and Tribunals -- (a) Marriage -- (b) The Mahr -- (c) Divorce -- (d) Children -- (e) Religious Councils -- 4. A pluralist legal system? -- (a) Official or State pluralism -- (b) Non-state or non-official pluralism -- THE GERMAN PERSPECTIVE - Michael Germann
  • 1. Short Inventory: Ecclesiastical Courts in Germany -- (a) Courts of the Roman Catholic Dioceses -- (b) Courts of the Protestant Churches -- (c) Courts of Smaller Christian Churches and Non-Christian religious communities -- 2. Constitutional Framework: the establishment and operation of ecclesiastical courts are acts of religious self-determination -- 3. Legal Effects: religious autonomy as opposed to public power -- (a) Ecclesiastical courts do not replace state courts -- (b) Foreign ecclesiastical courts may replace foreign state courts -- (c) Ecclesiastical courts can be set up as arbitral courts but they usually are not -- (d) Ecclesiastical courts bring religious autonomy to bear in state courts -- 4. Pluralism -- IV. RELIGIOUS DISPUTES REGARDING EMPLOYMENT IN GREAT BRITAIN - Lucy Vickers -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religious disputes between religious leaders and their religious communities: -- 3. Religious disputes and non-clergy employees of religious organisations: -- 4. Protection against discrimination -- (a) The Equality Act 2010. -- (b) Protection under other discrimination provisions -- 5. Future religious employment disputes? -- 6. Conclusion -- THE GERMAN PERSPECTIVE - Hinnerk Wißmann -- 1. Introduction -- (a) Comparative Approach UK - Germany -- (b) Cases of religious disputes -- 2. What does this mean for the state courts in cases concerning religious disputes? -- (a) Disputes between religious employees and non-religious employers -- (b) Disputes within religious organisations -- 3. The religious pluralisation as well as the Europeanisation require adjustments of the German system, which, however, should not undermine the substance of freedom of religion -- V. BALANCING RELIGIOUS AUTONOMY AND OTHER HUMAN RIGHTS UNDER THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION - Ian Leigh -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Status of Religious Organisations
  • 3. Clashes between autonomy and other human rights -- (a) Internal Disputes -- (b) Procedural Standards, Human Rights and Religious Adjudication -- (c) Private Life Cases -- 4. Conclusion -- SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS OF FREEDOM OF RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS UNDER THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS - Katharina Pabel -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religious Communities and Religious Freedom -- 3. The Freedom of Religious Associations -- (a) The Freedom of Religious Association -- (b) The Autonomy of Religious Communities -- 4. The Limitation of the Freedom of Religious Associations -- 5. Particular Cases -- (a) The Regulation of employment in Churches -- (b) »Procedural Standards, Human Rights and Religious Adjudication± -- VI. AUTONOMY AND ESTABLISHED CHURCHES: THOUGHTS ON ENGLISH ESTABLISHMENT(S) IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY - Peter W. Edge -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What is meant by establishment? -- 3. The developing situation -- (a) Church of England involvement with the State -- (b) State involvement in Church of England doctrine -- (c) State involvement in Islamic doctrine -- 4. Asymetrical disestablishment? -- C. Questions of Status and Organisation -- VII. THE PARTICIPATION OF RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN PUBLIC LIFE - THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE - Peter Cumper -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The role and status of religious schools -- 3. Religious Education -- (a) The Secular Approach -- (b) Christian criticisms of RE -- (c) Minority Faith Perspectives -- (d) RE, Faith and Religious Communities -- 4. Religious communities, human rights and publicly funded schools -- 5. Conclusion -- PARTICIPATION OF RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN PUBLIC LIFE - GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY - Antje von Ungern-Sternberg -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religion in public life: two models -- 3. The religious minority's perspective: equal access to privileges
  • (a) Factual impediments: state funding for faith schools (Great Britain) -- (b) Legal impediments: organisational requirements for religious communities (Germany) -- 4. The State's perspective: neutrality -- (a) Neutrality and objectors -- (b) Neutrality and religious communities -- 5. Conclusion -- VIII. THE LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM COMMUNITIES IN ENGLISH LAW - Julian Rivers -- 1. Assimilation to a Church-State Model -- 2. Equality, Multiculturalism and Security -- 3. Developments in the »status± of organized religions -- (a) Gains in public sector collaboration -- (b) Losses of internal autonomy -- 4. Conclusions -- THE LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM COMMUNITIES IN GERMANY - Gernot Sydow -- 1. Introduction: relevance of the concept of a particular »legal status± under German law -- 2. Muslim communities as representative dialogue partners -- 3. Legal status and legal capacity of Muslim organisations in Germany -- (a) Freedom of religion of Muslims and Muslim organisations -- (b) Recognition of religious associations as corporations under public law -- 4. Future developments: creating a new legal status for religious communities? -- Contributors to this Volume
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1469215
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (253 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783845243399
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1469215
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1469215
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11182671
  • (OCoLC)862049132
Label
Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Transformation of Church and State Relations in Great Britain and Germany - Introduction -- Contents -- A. Historical Development -- I. THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS IN ENGLAND - Augur Pearce -- 1. Introduction -- (a) Ecclesial state or established church? -- (b) The Brandenburg comparison -- 2. The middle ages - 597-1532 -- 3. Reformation to Revolution - 1532-1688 -- (a) Chronology of the Period -- (b) The Legislation of the 1530s -- (c) The ecclesial State -- (d) Private initiative in conformity with the public religion -- (e) Alternative religion - the penal laws -- (f) The universality of the public religion -- (g) Electoral Brandenburg - Territorial religious autonomy -- (h) Electoral Brandenburg - Doctrinal basis of the public religion -- (i) Electoral Brandenburg - Vehicles of ecclesiastical oversight -- (j) Electoral Brandenburg - limiting the princely prerogative -- 4. The »long eighteenth century± - 1688-1828 -- (a) Prelude - The return of the Jews -- (b) Chronology of the Period -- (c) The Coronation Oath, the Bill of Rights and the principle of parliamentary consent -- (d) The Toleration Act 1689 -- (aa) Individual alternative religion -- (bb) Alternative congregations and their preachers -- (cc) Religious societies -- (dd) Alternative religious trusts -- (ee) Privileges of alternative religion -- (e) Later developments affecting alternative religion -- (f) The universality of the public religion -- (g) Brandenburg-Prussia - The harmonisation of a patchwork of laws of religion -- (h) Brandenburg-Prussia - The legal position of Catholicism -- (i) Brandenburg-Prussia - Institutional expression of a »State± role in relation to religion -- 5. The »displaced nineteenth century± - 1828-1920 -- (a) Chronology of the Period -- (b) Voluntary religion - registration, fiscal privileges, and marriage
  • (c) Non-Christian religions and Non-religion -- (d) Continuing inequalities -- (e) Schools: a private religious initative -- (f) The Tractarian reaction -- (g) The voluntary face of the Church of England -- (h) Separation of Prussian protestant rules and structures from government agencies and the general law -- (i) Stricter and narrower - the Prussian churches under the later Hohenzollern -- 6. The mid- and late twentieth century - 1920-2000 -- (a) The fate of public religion in Wales -- (b) The two faces of the Church of England -- (c) Public religion and the law of marriage and gender -- (d) Private religion - statute aiding ecumenism -- (e) Private religion - the issue of ministerial discipline -- (f) Public and private religion - dialogue and partnership with government -- (g) Private non-Christian religion -- (h) Prussian religion under the Constitutions of 1919-20 -- 7. The new millennium - 2000-10 -- (a) Human rights »brought home± -- (b) Human rights and public religion -- (c) Equality law, civil partnership and the public services debate -- (d) Latest developments -- (e) Conclusion -- II. TRANSFORMATION OF CHURCH RELATIONS - THE SCANDINAVIAN EXPERIENCE - Lars Friedner -- 1. Sweden -- 2. Norway -- 3. Denmark -- 4. Conclusions -- B. Interactions between Religious and Secular Law -- III. LEGAL PROTECTION IN ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS - Mark Hill -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Church of England Courts -- (a) Chancellors -- (b) Registrars -- (c) Consistory courts -- (d) Appellate courts -- (e) The Court of Faculties -- (f) Judicial review -- 3. Muslim Courts and Tribunals -- (a) Marriage -- (b) The Mahr -- (c) Divorce -- (d) Children -- (e) Religious Councils -- 4. A pluralist legal system? -- (a) Official or State pluralism -- (b) Non-state or non-official pluralism -- THE GERMAN PERSPECTIVE - Michael Germann
  • 1. Short Inventory: Ecclesiastical Courts in Germany -- (a) Courts of the Roman Catholic Dioceses -- (b) Courts of the Protestant Churches -- (c) Courts of Smaller Christian Churches and Non-Christian religious communities -- 2. Constitutional Framework: the establishment and operation of ecclesiastical courts are acts of religious self-determination -- 3. Legal Effects: religious autonomy as opposed to public power -- (a) Ecclesiastical courts do not replace state courts -- (b) Foreign ecclesiastical courts may replace foreign state courts -- (c) Ecclesiastical courts can be set up as arbitral courts but they usually are not -- (d) Ecclesiastical courts bring religious autonomy to bear in state courts -- 4. Pluralism -- IV. RELIGIOUS DISPUTES REGARDING EMPLOYMENT IN GREAT BRITAIN - Lucy Vickers -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religious disputes between religious leaders and their religious communities: -- 3. Religious disputes and non-clergy employees of religious organisations: -- 4. Protection against discrimination -- (a) The Equality Act 2010. -- (b) Protection under other discrimination provisions -- 5. Future religious employment disputes? -- 6. Conclusion -- THE GERMAN PERSPECTIVE - Hinnerk Wißmann -- 1. Introduction -- (a) Comparative Approach UK - Germany -- (b) Cases of religious disputes -- 2. What does this mean for the state courts in cases concerning religious disputes? -- (a) Disputes between religious employees and non-religious employers -- (b) Disputes within religious organisations -- 3. The religious pluralisation as well as the Europeanisation require adjustments of the German system, which, however, should not undermine the substance of freedom of religion -- V. BALANCING RELIGIOUS AUTONOMY AND OTHER HUMAN RIGHTS UNDER THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION - Ian Leigh -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Status of Religious Organisations
  • 3. Clashes between autonomy and other human rights -- (a) Internal Disputes -- (b) Procedural Standards, Human Rights and Religious Adjudication -- (c) Private Life Cases -- 4. Conclusion -- SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS OF FREEDOM OF RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS UNDER THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS - Katharina Pabel -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religious Communities and Religious Freedom -- 3. The Freedom of Religious Associations -- (a) The Freedom of Religious Association -- (b) The Autonomy of Religious Communities -- 4. The Limitation of the Freedom of Religious Associations -- 5. Particular Cases -- (a) The Regulation of employment in Churches -- (b) »Procedural Standards, Human Rights and Religious Adjudication± -- VI. AUTONOMY AND ESTABLISHED CHURCHES: THOUGHTS ON ENGLISH ESTABLISHMENT(S) IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY - Peter W. Edge -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What is meant by establishment? -- 3. The developing situation -- (a) Church of England involvement with the State -- (b) State involvement in Church of England doctrine -- (c) State involvement in Islamic doctrine -- 4. Asymetrical disestablishment? -- C. Questions of Status and Organisation -- VII. THE PARTICIPATION OF RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN PUBLIC LIFE - THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE - Peter Cumper -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The role and status of religious schools -- 3. Religious Education -- (a) The Secular Approach -- (b) Christian criticisms of RE -- (c) Minority Faith Perspectives -- (d) RE, Faith and Religious Communities -- 4. Religious communities, human rights and publicly funded schools -- 5. Conclusion -- PARTICIPATION OF RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN PUBLIC LIFE - GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY - Antje von Ungern-Sternberg -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Religion in public life: two models -- 3. The religious minority's perspective: equal access to privileges
  • (a) Factual impediments: state funding for faith schools (Great Britain) -- (b) Legal impediments: organisational requirements for religious communities (Germany) -- 4. The State's perspective: neutrality -- (a) Neutrality and objectors -- (b) Neutrality and religious communities -- 5. Conclusion -- VIII. THE LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM COMMUNITIES IN ENGLISH LAW - Julian Rivers -- 1. Assimilation to a Church-State Model -- 2. Equality, Multiculturalism and Security -- 3. Developments in the »status± of organized religions -- (a) Gains in public sector collaboration -- (b) Losses of internal autonomy -- 4. Conclusions -- THE LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM COMMUNITIES IN GERMANY - Gernot Sydow -- 1. Introduction: relevance of the concept of a particular »legal status± under German law -- 2. Muslim communities as representative dialogue partners -- 3. Legal status and legal capacity of Muslim organisations in Germany -- (a) Freedom of religion of Muslims and Muslim organisations -- (b) Recognition of religious associations as corporations under public law -- 4. Future developments: creating a new legal status for religious communities? -- Contributors to this Volume
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1469215
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (253 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783845243399
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1469215
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1469215
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11182671
  • (OCoLC)862049132

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