Coverart for item
The Resource The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture, Bernadette Andrea, (electronic resource)

The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture, Bernadette Andrea, (electronic resource)

Label
The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture
Title
The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture
Statement of responsibility
Bernadette Andrea
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Andrea's thorough and insightful analysis of historical documents, visual records, and literary works focuses on five extraordinary women: Elen More and Lucy Negro, both from Islamic West Africa; Ipolita the Tartarian, a girl acquired from Islamic Central Asia; Teresa Sampsonia, a Circassian from the Safavid Empire; and Mariam Khanim, an Armenian from the Mughal Empire. By analysing these women's lives and their impact on the literary and cultural life of proto-colonial England, Andrea reveals that they are simultaneously significant constituents of the emerging Anglo-centric discourse of empire and cultural agents in their own right. The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British Literature and Culture advances a methodology based on microhistory, cross-cultural feminist studies, and postcolonial approaches to the early modern period."--
  • "Andrea's thorough and insightful analysis of historical documents, visual records, and literary works focuses on five extraordinary women: Elen More and Lucy Negro, both from Islamic West Africa; Ipolita the Tartarian, a girl acquired from Islamic Central Asia; Teresa Sampsonia, a Circassian from the Safavid Empire; and Mariam Khanim, an Armenian from the Mughal Empire. By analysing these women's lives and their impact on the literary and cultural life of proto-colonial England, Andrea reveals that they are simultaneously significant constituents of the emerging Anglo-centric discourse of empire and cultural agents in their own right. The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British Literature and Culture advances a methodology based on microhistory, cross-cultural feminist studies, and postcolonial approaches to the early modern period."--
  • "Andrea's thorough and insightful analysis of historical documents, visual records, and literary works focuses on five extraordinary women: Elen More and Lucy Negro, both from Islamic West Africa; Ipolita the Tartarian, a girl acquired from Islamic Central Asia; Teresa Sampsonia, a Circassian from the Safavid Empire; and Mariam Khanim, an Armenian from the Mughal Empire. By analysing these women's lives and their impact on the literary and cultural life of proto-colonial England, Andrea reveals that they are simultaneously significant constituents of the emerging Anglo-centric discourse of empire and cultural agents in their own right. The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British Literature and Culture advances a methodology based on microhistory, cross-cultural feminist studies, and postcolonial approaches to the early modern period."--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Andrea, Bernadette Diane
Dewey number
820.9/3522
LC call number
PR428.W63
LC item number
A62 2017
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • Women and literature
  • Women and literature
  • Islam and literature
  • Islam and literature
  • Women in literature
  • Girls in literature
  • Islamic civilization in literature
  • Islam in literature
  • Littérature anglaise
  • Littérature anglaise
  • Femmes et littérature
  • Femmes et littérature
  • Islam et littérature
  • Islam et littérature
  • Femmes dans la littérature
  • Filles dans la littérature
  • Civilisation islamique dans la littérature
  • Islam dans la littérature
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • Girls in literature
  • Islam and literature
  • Islam in literature
  • Islamic civilization in literature
  • Women and literature
  • Women in literature
  • Great Britain
Label
The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture, Bernadette Andrea, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 193-237) and index
Contents
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001957997
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9781487501259
Lccn
2016590578
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001957997
Label
The lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in early modern British literature and culture, Bernadette Andrea, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 193-237) and index
Contents
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
  • Introduction: can the subaltern signify? Tracing the lives of girls and women from the Islamic world in British literature and culture, c. 1500-1630 -- The "presences of women" from the Islamic world in late medieval Scotland and early modern England -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Queen Elizabeth I, the Tartar girl, and the Tartar-Indian woman -- The Islamic world and the construction of early modern Englishwomen's authorship: Lady Mary Wroth, the Tartar-Persian princess, and the Tartar king -- Signifying gender and Islam in early Shakespeare: Henry VIII or All is true (1613) and British "Masques of blackness" -- The intersecting paths of two women from the Islamic world: Teresa Sampsonia, Mariam Khanim, and the East India Company
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001957997
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9781487501259
Lccn
2016590578
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001957997

Library Locations

    • UMKCBorrow it
      800 E 51st St, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.035061 -94.576518
    • Health Sciences LibraryBorrow it
      2411 Holmes St, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 64108, US
      39.083418 -94.575323
    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
Processing Feedback ...