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The Resource The heart of things : a Midwestern almanac, John Hildebrand, (electronic resource)

The heart of things : a Midwestern almanac, John Hildebrand, (electronic resource)

Label
The heart of things : a Midwestern almanac
Title
The heart of things
Title remainder
a Midwestern almanac
Statement of responsibility
John Hildebrand
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • ""I've never believed that living in one place means being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Life is more complicated than that." In this remarkable book of days, John Hildebrand charts the overlapping rings-home, town, countryside-of life in the Midwest. Like E. B. White, Hildebrand locates the humor and drama in ordinary life: church suppers, Friday night football, outdoor weddings, garden compost, family reunions, roadside memorials, camouflage clothing. In these wry, sharply observed essays, the Midwest isn't The Land Time Forgot but a more complicated (and vastly more interesting) place where the good life awaits once we figure exactly out what it means. From his home range in northwestern Wisconsin, Hildebrand attempts to do just that by boiling down a calendar year to its rich marrow of weather, animals, family, home-in other words, all the things that matter. "--
  • "In lyrical prose, author John Hildebrand charts the seasons, landscapes, and people of the Midwest. In the same way that E.B. White's essays documented life in Maine, Hildebrand creates a unique portrait of Wisconsin by focusing on ordinary life through the seasons. The almanac style of month-by-month chapters invites readers to approach the book from any direction, entering at whatever chapter strikes their mood at time--January if that's what month it happens to be or July if one is sick of the snow and anticipating summer. Whether describing a night ski race across Chequamegon Bay, a Friday-night fish boil at his local parish, or a possum playing dead atop his backyard compost pile, Hildebrand portrays a place both familiar and fresh. As he explains, "I've never accepted the idea that being from the Midwest meant being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Our lives are more complicated than that. Even when I've written about what appear to be fixed traditions, like church suppers or small town football or deer hunting--they're just snapshots in time. The essays include revised Wisconsin Trails pieces (now free of their 700-word limit) and others pieces written for magazines such as Sports Illustrated, plus a few completely new essays"--
  • ""I've never believed that living in one place means being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Life is more complicated than that." In this remarkable book of days, John Hildebrand charts the overlapping rings-home, town, countryside-of life in the Midwest. Like E. B. White, Hildebrand locates the humor and drama in ordinary life: church suppers, Friday night football, outdoor weddings, garden compost, family reunions, roadside memorials, camouflage clothing. In these wry, sharply observed essays, the Midwest isn't The Land Time Forgot but a more complicated (and vastly more interesting) place where the good life awaits once we figure exactly out what it means. From his home range in northwestern Wisconsin, Hildebrand attempts to do just that by boiling down a calendar year to its rich marrow of weather, animals, family, home-in other words, all the things that matter. "--
  • "In lyrical prose, author John Hildebrand charts the seasons, landscapes, and people of the Midwest. In the same way that E.B. White's essays documented life in Maine, Hildebrand creates a unique portrait of Wisconsin by focusing on ordinary life through the seasons. The almanac style of month-by-month chapters invites readers to approach the book from any direction, entering at whatever chapter strikes their mood at time--January if that's what month it happens to be or July if one is sick of the snow and anticipating summer. Whether describing a night ski race across Chequamegon Bay, a Friday-night fish boil at his local parish, or a possum playing dead atop his backyard compost pile, Hildebrand portrays a place both familiar and fresh. As he explains, "I've never accepted the idea that being from the Midwest meant being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Our lives are more complicated than that. Even when I've written about what appear to be fixed traditions, like church suppers or small town football or deer hunting--they're just snapshots in time. The essays include revised Wisconsin Trails pieces (now free of their 700-word limit) and others pieces written for magazines such as Sports Illustrated, plus a few completely new essays"--
  • "I've never believed that living in one place means being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Life is more complicated than that." In this remarkable book of days, John Hildebrand charts the overlapping rings-home, town, countryside-of life in the Midwest. Like E. B. White, Hildebrand locates the humor and drama in ordinary life: church suppers, Friday night football, outdoor weddings, garden compost, family reunions, roadside memorials, camouflage clothing. In these wry, sharply observed essays, the Midwest isn't The Land Time Forgot but a more complicated (and vastly more interesting) place where the good life awaits once we figure exactly out what it means. From his home range in northwestern Wisconsin, Hildebrand attempts to do just that by boiling down a calendar year to its rich marrow of weather, animals, family, home-in other words, all the things that matter."--
  • "In lyrical prose, author John Hildebrand charts the seasons, landscapes, and people of the Midwest. In the same way that E.B. White's essays documented life in Maine, Hildebrand creates a unique portrait of Wisconsin by focusing on ordinary life through the seasons. The almanac style of month-by-month chapters invites readers to approach the book from any direction, entering at whatever chapter strikes their mood at time--January if that's what month it happens to be or July if one is sick of the snow and anticipating summer. Whether describing a night ski race across Chequamegon Bay, a Friday-night fish boil at his local parish, or a possum playing dead atop his backyard compost pile, Hildebrand portrays a place both familiar and fresh. As he explains, "I've never accepted the idea that being from the Midwest meant being one thing all the time, condemned like Minnie Pearl to wear the same hat for every performance. Our lives are more complicated than that. Even when I've written about what appear to be fixed traditions, like church suppers or small town football or deer hunting--they're just snapshots in time. The essays include revised Wisconsin Trails pieces (now free of their 700-word limit) and others pieces written for magazines such as Sports Illustrated, plus a few completely new essays"--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hildebrand, John
Dewey number
977
LC call number
F581.6
LC item number
.H55 2014
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Country life
  • Wisconsin
  • Wisconsin
  • Middle West
  • Middle West
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs
  • HUMOR / General
  • HUMOR / Form / Essays
  • LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Essays
Label
The heart of things : a Midwestern almanac, John Hildebrand, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001352692
Dimensions
22 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xi, 188 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780870206726
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014018398
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001352692
Label
The heart of things : a Midwestern almanac, John Hildebrand, (electronic resource)
Publication
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001352692
Dimensions
22 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xi, 188 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780870206726
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014018398
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001352692

Library Locations

    • UMKCBorrow it
      800 E 51st St, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.035061 -94.576518
    • Health Sciences LibraryBorrow it
      2411 Holmes St, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 64108, US
      39.083418 -94.575323
    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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