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The Resource Reconstituting the Constitution :

Reconstituting the Constitution :

Label
Reconstituting the Constitution :
Title
Reconstituting the Constitution :
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Morris, Caroline
Dewey number
340
LC call number
K-KZ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Boston, Jonathan
  • Butler, Petra
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Constitutional law -- New Zealand
  • Constitutional law
  • Constitutions -- New Zealand
  • Constitutions
Label
Reconstituting the Constitution :
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Reconstituting the Constitution -- Preface -- Contents -- Part 1: Reconstituting the Constitution: An Overview -- Chapter 1: Building the Constitution: Debates -- Assumptions -- Developments 2000-2010 -- 1.1 Building the Constitution 2000: The Conference -- 1.2 Building the Constitution 2000: The Issues -- 1.2.1 What Constitutes Our Nation? -- 1.2.2 The Constitution and the World Around/the Constraints of Treaties and International Law16 -- 1.2.3 What Constitutes the Constitution? -- 1.2.4 The Treaty of Waitangi and the Constitution -- 1.2.5 Multiculturalism and the Constitution -- 1.2.6 Who Should Be Head of State? -- 1.2.7 The Cabinet, Public Service and Subnational Government -- 1.2.8 Should Parliament Be Changed? -- 1.2.9 What Role for the Judges? -- 1.2.10 A Written Constitution? -- 1.2.11 The Reconstituting the Constitution Agenda: The Gaps -- 1.3 Building the Constitution: Shared Assumptions -- 1.3.1 Respect for Constitutionalism Is Fundamental to Our Democracy and to Rebuilding the Constitution -- 1.3.2 The Most Significant of the Fundamental Issues that Must be Settled is the Question of the Constitutional Status of the Treaty of Waitangi -- 1.3.3 New Zealand will Continue to be a Parliamentary Democracy -- 1.3.4 Constitutions are Not Only about Rules Establishing the Formal Distribution of Political Power Within a State -- the External Context Must be Considered in Constitutional Development, Both as Cause and Consequence -- 1.3.5 Constitutions are Not Only about Rules about the Formal Distribution of Political Power -- New Zealandś Social Culture Must be Considered as Both Cause and Consequence of Change -- 1.3.6 It is Inevitable that New Zealand will Become a Republic -- 1.3.7 New Zealandś Tradition of Constitutional Change is Evolutionary and P̀̀ragmatić.́
  • 1.3.8 Whether or Not New Zealand Adopts a Written Constitution, Constitutional Codification Had Been Recently Increasing -- 1.3.9 Future Constitutional Reforms Must Use Legitimate and Appropriate Change Processes -- 1.4 Rebuilding the Constitution, 2000-2010: Debate, Change, and No-Change -- 1.4.1 Case-Study: The Supreme Court Act 2003 -- 1.5 Constitutions and the Problem of Process -- References -- Chapter 2: Reconstituting the Constitution: Opening Address I -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Relevance of Constitutional Change -- 2.3 The Contents of a New Constitution -- 2.4 The Need for a Conversation -- 2.5 The Challenge for the Future -- References -- Chapter 3: Reconstituting the Constitution: Opening Address II -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Republic -- 3.3 Written Constitution -- 3.4 Treaty of Waitangi -- 3.5 An Emerging Area of Constitutional Law? -- 3.6 The Long Road to Constitutional Change -- References -- Part 2: Reforming Constitutions: Lessons from Abroad -- Chapter 4: South Africás Experience in Constitution-Building -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 A Brief History of the South African Process -- 4.3 Constitution-Making in the Constitutional Assembly -- 4.3.1 Negotiating the F̀̀inaĺ ́Constitution -- 4.4 Five Sources of Variation Reflected in the History of Constitution-Building in South Africa -- 4.4.1 The Temporal Dimension -- 4.4.2 A Question of Process -- 4.4.3 Participation as an Element of Constitution-Building -- 4.4.4 Constitutional Principles as an Element of Constitution-Building -- 4.4.5 Institutional Design and Substantive Choices -- 4.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Constitutional Reform in the United Kingdom: Past, Present and Future -- 5.1 Genesis of Labouŕs Constitutional Reform Programme: Unbridled Power -- 5.2 Implementation of Labouŕs Constitutional Reforms -- 5.2.1 Effectiveness of Labouŕs Constitutional Reforms
  • 5.2.2 Devolution -- 5.2.3 Reform of the House of Lords -- 5.2.4 Human Rights Act -- 5.2.5 New Supreme Court and Independent Judiciary -- 5.2.6 Freedom of Information -- 5.2.7 Unfinished Business from Blaiŕs Reforms -- 5.2.7.1 Devolution in England -- 5.2.7.2 Referendum on the Voting System -- 5.2.7.3 An Elected Second Chamber -- 5.2.7.4 A British Bill of Rights -- 5.2.8 Gordon Browńs Reform Agenda in 2007 -- 5.3 Election of the Coalition Government in 2010 -- 5.3.1 The Conservative-Liberal Democrat Agenda for Constitutional Reform -- 5.3.2 Prospects for the New Reform Agenda -- 5.4 Unwritten Constitutions and Their Guardians -- References -- Part 3: The Republican Question -- Chapter 6: A Republic for New Zealand? A Modest Approach -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Addressing the Republican Arguments -- 6.2.1 The Constitutional Framework -- 6.2.2 New Zealand National Identity -- 6.2.3 The Treaty of Waitangi -- 6.2.4 Economic Sovereignty -- 6.2.5 Other Constitutional Reforms -- 6.3 Becoming a Republic -- 6.3.1 Suggestions for Change -- Chapter 7: Patriating Our Head of State: A Simpler Path? -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Why? -- 7.3 Who? -- 7.4 What? -- 7.5 When? -- 7.6 How? -- 7.7 Conclusion -- References -- Part 4: The Need for a Written Constitution? Strengthening the Bill of Rights Act and the Place of the Treaty of Waitangi -- Chapter 8: The Advantages and Disadvantages of a Supreme Constitution for New Zealand: The Problem with Pragmatic Constitutional Evolution -- 8.1 What Is the Real Constitutional Issue for New Zealand? -- 8.2 Thesis -- 8.3 New Zealandś Constitution -- 8.4 Options for Reform -- 8.5 Impetus for Reform -- 8.6 The Disadvantages of a Supreme Constitution -- 8.6.1 No Problem Warranting a Topshelf Solution -- 8.6.2 Legacy of MMP and the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 -- 8.6.3 Pandorás Box39 -- 8.6.4 Greater Judicial Power
  • 8.7 The Advantages of a Supreme Constitution -- 8.7.1 Constitutional Reform Is Properly Defined and Uses Legitimate Change Processes -- 8.7.1.1 Use of Referenda -- 8.7.1.2 Convention of Special Processes for Constitutional Change? -- 8.7.2 Constitutional Protection for a Wider Range of Rights and Freedoms? -- 8.7.2.1 Inadequacy of Current Quality Regulation Measures -- 8.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: Protecting Rights -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Areas Where the Bill of Rights Is Working Well -- 9.3 Areas Where the Bill of Rights Could Be Improved -- 9.3.1 Lack of Domestic Remedy Where Legislation Breaches Rights -- 9.3.1.1 Adopting a Bill of Rights That Is Supreme Law -- 9.3.1.2 Adopting a Bill of Rights Based on the Canadian Charter -- 9.3.1.3 Adopting a Bill of Rights Based on the Human Rights Act 1998 (UK) -- 9.3.1.4 Our View -- 9.3.2 No Express Remedies Provision -- 9.3.3 Attorney-General Vetting Procedure -- 9.3.4 Right of Privacy -- 9.3.5 Social and Economic Rights -- 9.3.6 Property Rights -- 9.3.7 Treaty of Waitangi -- 9.4 Would Having a Written Constitution Make a Difference? -- 9.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10: The Status and Nature of the Treaty of Waitangi -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Partnership and the Treaty of Waitangi -- 10.2.1 Partnership in the Past -- 10.2.2 Partnership in the Present Day -- 10.2.3 Partnership in the Future -- 10.3 Conclusion -- References -- Part 5: The Future of Electoral Law -- Chapter 11: The Future of Electoral Law -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Electoral and Constitutional Change -- 11.3 Processes for Electoral Change -- 11.4 Constitutional Reforms -- Chapter 12: A Better Democracy, Thanks to MMP -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 The Need for a New Electoral System -- 12.3 The Road to MMP -- 12.4 Better Representation -- 12.4.1 General -- 12.4.2 Better Representation: Women
  • 12.4.3 Better Representation: Māori -- 12.4.4 Better Representation: Asian and Pacific Island New Zealanders -- 12.4.5 Better Representation: Sexual Minorities -- 12.4.6 Better Representation: Ideological Mix -- 12.4.7 Better Representation: Less Dissatisfaction -- 12.5 Consequences for Public Policy -- 12.5.1 Overview -- 12.5.2 Slowing the Legislative Process -- 12.5.3 Increased Ambiguity -- 12.5.4 Increased Influence of Parliamentary Committees -- 12.5.5 Increased Voter Sophistication -- 12.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: The Future of Electoral Law -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 The Māori Seats -- 13.2.1 Origin of the Seats -- 13.2.2 Symbolic Significance -- 13.2.3 Abolition of the Seats -- 13.2.4 The Utilitarian Argument -- 13.2.5 Voter Behaviour -- 13.2.6 The Treaty Argument -- 13.2.7 The Entrenchment Argument -- 13.2.8 Cultural Placement of the Debate -- 13.3 Future of MMP -- 13.3.1 Electoral Referenda -- 13.3.2 Criticisms of MMP -- 13.3.3 Whither the Referenda Outcomes? -- 13.4 Fixed Term Parliaments -- 13.4.1 Case for Change -- 13.4.2 Safety-Valve -- 13.4.3 Is There a Problem? -- 13.5 Term of Parliament -- 13.5.1 Obvious and Warranted Reform -- 13.5.2 Royal Commission Recommendation -- 13.5.3 Prospects of Reform -- 13.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: Misbehaving Members of Parliament and How to Deal with Them -- 14.1 An Introduction to the Problem -- 14.1.1 The Regulation Options -- 14.2 MPs Behaving Badly -- 14.2.1 The United Kingdom Scandal -- 14.2.2 The New Zealand Scandal -- 14.2.3 Why Are Solutions Needed? -- 14.3 S̀̀oft́́ Internal Regulation -- 14.3.1 A Code of Conduct for the New Zealand Parliament? -- 14.4 H̀̀ard ́́Internal Regulation -- 14.4.1 Expulsions -- 14.4.2 Other Punishments -- 14.4.3 The Problem with Privilege -- 14.5 External Regulation -- 14.5.1 The Parliamentary Standards Bill
  • 14.5.2 The Parliamentary Standards Act
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC798671
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (512 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783642215728
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC798671
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL798671
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10499297
  • (OCoLC)763157317
Label
Reconstituting the Constitution :
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Reconstituting the Constitution -- Preface -- Contents -- Part 1: Reconstituting the Constitution: An Overview -- Chapter 1: Building the Constitution: Debates -- Assumptions -- Developments 2000-2010 -- 1.1 Building the Constitution 2000: The Conference -- 1.2 Building the Constitution 2000: The Issues -- 1.2.1 What Constitutes Our Nation? -- 1.2.2 The Constitution and the World Around/the Constraints of Treaties and International Law16 -- 1.2.3 What Constitutes the Constitution? -- 1.2.4 The Treaty of Waitangi and the Constitution -- 1.2.5 Multiculturalism and the Constitution -- 1.2.6 Who Should Be Head of State? -- 1.2.7 The Cabinet, Public Service and Subnational Government -- 1.2.8 Should Parliament Be Changed? -- 1.2.9 What Role for the Judges? -- 1.2.10 A Written Constitution? -- 1.2.11 The Reconstituting the Constitution Agenda: The Gaps -- 1.3 Building the Constitution: Shared Assumptions -- 1.3.1 Respect for Constitutionalism Is Fundamental to Our Democracy and to Rebuilding the Constitution -- 1.3.2 The Most Significant of the Fundamental Issues that Must be Settled is the Question of the Constitutional Status of the Treaty of Waitangi -- 1.3.3 New Zealand will Continue to be a Parliamentary Democracy -- 1.3.4 Constitutions are Not Only about Rules Establishing the Formal Distribution of Political Power Within a State -- the External Context Must be Considered in Constitutional Development, Both as Cause and Consequence -- 1.3.5 Constitutions are Not Only about Rules about the Formal Distribution of Political Power -- New Zealandś Social Culture Must be Considered as Both Cause and Consequence of Change -- 1.3.6 It is Inevitable that New Zealand will Become a Republic -- 1.3.7 New Zealandś Tradition of Constitutional Change is Evolutionary and P̀̀ragmatić.́
  • 1.3.8 Whether or Not New Zealand Adopts a Written Constitution, Constitutional Codification Had Been Recently Increasing -- 1.3.9 Future Constitutional Reforms Must Use Legitimate and Appropriate Change Processes -- 1.4 Rebuilding the Constitution, 2000-2010: Debate, Change, and No-Change -- 1.4.1 Case-Study: The Supreme Court Act 2003 -- 1.5 Constitutions and the Problem of Process -- References -- Chapter 2: Reconstituting the Constitution: Opening Address I -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Relevance of Constitutional Change -- 2.3 The Contents of a New Constitution -- 2.4 The Need for a Conversation -- 2.5 The Challenge for the Future -- References -- Chapter 3: Reconstituting the Constitution: Opening Address II -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Republic -- 3.3 Written Constitution -- 3.4 Treaty of Waitangi -- 3.5 An Emerging Area of Constitutional Law? -- 3.6 The Long Road to Constitutional Change -- References -- Part 2: Reforming Constitutions: Lessons from Abroad -- Chapter 4: South Africás Experience in Constitution-Building -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 A Brief History of the South African Process -- 4.3 Constitution-Making in the Constitutional Assembly -- 4.3.1 Negotiating the F̀̀inaĺ ́Constitution -- 4.4 Five Sources of Variation Reflected in the History of Constitution-Building in South Africa -- 4.4.1 The Temporal Dimension -- 4.4.2 A Question of Process -- 4.4.3 Participation as an Element of Constitution-Building -- 4.4.4 Constitutional Principles as an Element of Constitution-Building -- 4.4.5 Institutional Design and Substantive Choices -- 4.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Constitutional Reform in the United Kingdom: Past, Present and Future -- 5.1 Genesis of Labouŕs Constitutional Reform Programme: Unbridled Power -- 5.2 Implementation of Labouŕs Constitutional Reforms -- 5.2.1 Effectiveness of Labouŕs Constitutional Reforms
  • 5.2.2 Devolution -- 5.2.3 Reform of the House of Lords -- 5.2.4 Human Rights Act -- 5.2.5 New Supreme Court and Independent Judiciary -- 5.2.6 Freedom of Information -- 5.2.7 Unfinished Business from Blaiŕs Reforms -- 5.2.7.1 Devolution in England -- 5.2.7.2 Referendum on the Voting System -- 5.2.7.3 An Elected Second Chamber -- 5.2.7.4 A British Bill of Rights -- 5.2.8 Gordon Browńs Reform Agenda in 2007 -- 5.3 Election of the Coalition Government in 2010 -- 5.3.1 The Conservative-Liberal Democrat Agenda for Constitutional Reform -- 5.3.2 Prospects for the New Reform Agenda -- 5.4 Unwritten Constitutions and Their Guardians -- References -- Part 3: The Republican Question -- Chapter 6: A Republic for New Zealand? A Modest Approach -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Addressing the Republican Arguments -- 6.2.1 The Constitutional Framework -- 6.2.2 New Zealand National Identity -- 6.2.3 The Treaty of Waitangi -- 6.2.4 Economic Sovereignty -- 6.2.5 Other Constitutional Reforms -- 6.3 Becoming a Republic -- 6.3.1 Suggestions for Change -- Chapter 7: Patriating Our Head of State: A Simpler Path? -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Why? -- 7.3 Who? -- 7.4 What? -- 7.5 When? -- 7.6 How? -- 7.7 Conclusion -- References -- Part 4: The Need for a Written Constitution? Strengthening the Bill of Rights Act and the Place of the Treaty of Waitangi -- Chapter 8: The Advantages and Disadvantages of a Supreme Constitution for New Zealand: The Problem with Pragmatic Constitutional Evolution -- 8.1 What Is the Real Constitutional Issue for New Zealand? -- 8.2 Thesis -- 8.3 New Zealandś Constitution -- 8.4 Options for Reform -- 8.5 Impetus for Reform -- 8.6 The Disadvantages of a Supreme Constitution -- 8.6.1 No Problem Warranting a Topshelf Solution -- 8.6.2 Legacy of MMP and the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 -- 8.6.3 Pandorás Box39 -- 8.6.4 Greater Judicial Power
  • 8.7 The Advantages of a Supreme Constitution -- 8.7.1 Constitutional Reform Is Properly Defined and Uses Legitimate Change Processes -- 8.7.1.1 Use of Referenda -- 8.7.1.2 Convention of Special Processes for Constitutional Change? -- 8.7.2 Constitutional Protection for a Wider Range of Rights and Freedoms? -- 8.7.2.1 Inadequacy of Current Quality Regulation Measures -- 8.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: Protecting Rights -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Areas Where the Bill of Rights Is Working Well -- 9.3 Areas Where the Bill of Rights Could Be Improved -- 9.3.1 Lack of Domestic Remedy Where Legislation Breaches Rights -- 9.3.1.1 Adopting a Bill of Rights That Is Supreme Law -- 9.3.1.2 Adopting a Bill of Rights Based on the Canadian Charter -- 9.3.1.3 Adopting a Bill of Rights Based on the Human Rights Act 1998 (UK) -- 9.3.1.4 Our View -- 9.3.2 No Express Remedies Provision -- 9.3.3 Attorney-General Vetting Procedure -- 9.3.4 Right of Privacy -- 9.3.5 Social and Economic Rights -- 9.3.6 Property Rights -- 9.3.7 Treaty of Waitangi -- 9.4 Would Having a Written Constitution Make a Difference? -- 9.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10: The Status and Nature of the Treaty of Waitangi -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Partnership and the Treaty of Waitangi -- 10.2.1 Partnership in the Past -- 10.2.2 Partnership in the Present Day -- 10.2.3 Partnership in the Future -- 10.3 Conclusion -- References -- Part 5: The Future of Electoral Law -- Chapter 11: The Future of Electoral Law -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Electoral and Constitutional Change -- 11.3 Processes for Electoral Change -- 11.4 Constitutional Reforms -- Chapter 12: A Better Democracy, Thanks to MMP -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 The Need for a New Electoral System -- 12.3 The Road to MMP -- 12.4 Better Representation -- 12.4.1 General -- 12.4.2 Better Representation: Women
  • 12.4.3 Better Representation: Māori -- 12.4.4 Better Representation: Asian and Pacific Island New Zealanders -- 12.4.5 Better Representation: Sexual Minorities -- 12.4.6 Better Representation: Ideological Mix -- 12.4.7 Better Representation: Less Dissatisfaction -- 12.5 Consequences for Public Policy -- 12.5.1 Overview -- 12.5.2 Slowing the Legislative Process -- 12.5.3 Increased Ambiguity -- 12.5.4 Increased Influence of Parliamentary Committees -- 12.5.5 Increased Voter Sophistication -- 12.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: The Future of Electoral Law -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 The Māori Seats -- 13.2.1 Origin of the Seats -- 13.2.2 Symbolic Significance -- 13.2.3 Abolition of the Seats -- 13.2.4 The Utilitarian Argument -- 13.2.5 Voter Behaviour -- 13.2.6 The Treaty Argument -- 13.2.7 The Entrenchment Argument -- 13.2.8 Cultural Placement of the Debate -- 13.3 Future of MMP -- 13.3.1 Electoral Referenda -- 13.3.2 Criticisms of MMP -- 13.3.3 Whither the Referenda Outcomes? -- 13.4 Fixed Term Parliaments -- 13.4.1 Case for Change -- 13.4.2 Safety-Valve -- 13.4.3 Is There a Problem? -- 13.5 Term of Parliament -- 13.5.1 Obvious and Warranted Reform -- 13.5.2 Royal Commission Recommendation -- 13.5.3 Prospects of Reform -- 13.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: Misbehaving Members of Parliament and How to Deal with Them -- 14.1 An Introduction to the Problem -- 14.1.1 The Regulation Options -- 14.2 MPs Behaving Badly -- 14.2.1 The United Kingdom Scandal -- 14.2.2 The New Zealand Scandal -- 14.2.3 Why Are Solutions Needed? -- 14.3 S̀̀oft́́ Internal Regulation -- 14.3.1 A Code of Conduct for the New Zealand Parliament? -- 14.4 H̀̀ard ́́Internal Regulation -- 14.4.1 Expulsions -- 14.4.2 Other Punishments -- 14.4.3 The Problem with Privilege -- 14.5 External Regulation -- 14.5.1 The Parliamentary Standards Bill
  • 14.5.2 The Parliamentary Standards Act
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC798671
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (512 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783642215728
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC798671
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL798671
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10499297
  • (OCoLC)763157317

Library Locations

    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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