The Resource Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales : the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910, by Joseph Walden Baumli, (electronic resource)

Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales : the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910, by Joseph Walden Baumli, (electronic resource)

Label
Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales : the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910
Title
Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales
Title remainder
the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910
Statement of responsibility
by Joseph Walden Baumli
Title variation
Settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910
Creator
Contributor
Thesis advisor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This study analyzes the average settler that came to Nodaway County, Missouri in the nineteenth century and the communities created throughout the area. It investigates where these people came from, their occupations, ethnic, political, and religious backgrounds, the institutions they created, and their rationale for settling on the untamed prairie of northwest Missouri. The residents' work habits, recreational activities, and leisure time are also examined to determine lifestyles. Researching the settlers that came to northwest Missouri is a difficult task. Many of the early residents of the area were poorly educated and very few of those that were literate kept diaries or journals of their travels to the region and their lives in the community. There have been no scholarly inquiries concerning the settling of Nodaway County and little research on the history of the area. A strong tradition of oral history has been maintained but often the validity of this information must be questioned. There were several newspapers published throughout the area. Many of these publications attracted circulation by offering special articles and editions concerning the area's early period related by long time residents. Without these papers, much of the history concerning the towns and common people in the region would be difficult to acquire. Research determined that most of the people that settled early in Nodaway County came from slaveholding states, but few actually owned slaves. Many of the inhabitants were of the Protestant faith, but Roman Catholics were also in the area. Nearly all occupations necessary for life on the frontier were represented and analysis points out that the settlers and town builders had strong religious values and were dedicated in providing their children with a good education. The large population increase in the county in the latter decades of the nineteenth century was due to railroad expansion but the county could not attract enough people to create an urban landscape and started declining in numbers early in the twentieth century. Although the inhabitants worked hard, research points out that often they played nearly as hard as they toiled dedicating considerable time to recreational activities
Additional physical form
Online version of the print edition.
Cataloging source
UMK
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Baumli, Joseph Walden
Degree
Ph. D.
Dissertation year
2004.
Granting institution
Dept. of History and School of Education. University of Missouri--Kansas City
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
  • theses
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Potts, Louis W.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nodaway County (Mo.)
  • Land settlement
  • Human settlements
Label
Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales : the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910, by Joseph Walden Baumli, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A dissertation in history and urban leadership and policy studies in education."
  • Advisor: Louis W. Potts
  • Typescript
  • Vita
  • Title from "catalog record" of the print edition
  • Description based on contents viewed Feb. 22, 2006
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 363-372)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
(1800-1836) Early explorers, Native Americans, statehood, and the Platte Purchase -- (1836-1845) The first settlers, creation of Nodaway County, the establishment of the county seat at Maryville, early settlements, and grist mills -- (1845-1855) Missouri School and State census of 1848 and 1852, Federal Census of 1850, the Gold Rush and population loss, the Border Dispute with Iowa, and the Honey War -- (1850-1860) The early inhabitants of Nodaway County: their origins, cultural and political backgrounds, and the first settlements and post offices -- (1860-1870) Slavery in Nodaway County: the Underground Railroad, the Civil War in the County, neighbor against neighbor, a return to normalcy, and the beginning of railroad building -- (1870-1890) The "boom" period of Nodaway County: railroads, town building, and population increase -- (1880-1910) Nodaway County achieves maturity and its "golden age:" who and where the County's residents came from, "ghost towns" of the area, and Maryville's dominance throughout the county and region -- (1845-1910) Nodaway County residents' religious values and emphasis on educating their youth: the various schools throughout the County, and the area's religious faiths, churches, and cemeteries -- (1839-1910) Area residents at work and play: hardships settling the County, work activities, and leisure time including: social functions, clubs and organizations, and town picnics and fairs -- Conclusion
Control code
68812610
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
xi, 373 leaves
Form of item
electronic
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Prairie trails, iron rails, and tall tales : the settling, town building, and people of Nodaway County, Missouri, 1839-1910, by Joseph Walden Baumli, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
  • "A dissertation in history and urban leadership and policy studies in education."
  • Advisor: Louis W. Potts
  • Typescript
  • Vita
  • Title from "catalog record" of the print edition
  • Description based on contents viewed Feb. 22, 2006
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 363-372)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
(1800-1836) Early explorers, Native Americans, statehood, and the Platte Purchase -- (1836-1845) The first settlers, creation of Nodaway County, the establishment of the county seat at Maryville, early settlements, and grist mills -- (1845-1855) Missouri School and State census of 1848 and 1852, Federal Census of 1850, the Gold Rush and population loss, the Border Dispute with Iowa, and the Honey War -- (1850-1860) The early inhabitants of Nodaway County: their origins, cultural and political backgrounds, and the first settlements and post offices -- (1860-1870) Slavery in Nodaway County: the Underground Railroad, the Civil War in the County, neighbor against neighbor, a return to normalcy, and the beginning of railroad building -- (1870-1890) The "boom" period of Nodaway County: railroads, town building, and population increase -- (1880-1910) Nodaway County achieves maturity and its "golden age:" who and where the County's residents came from, "ghost towns" of the area, and Maryville's dominance throughout the county and region -- (1845-1910) Nodaway County residents' religious values and emphasis on educating their youth: the various schools throughout the County, and the area's religious faiths, churches, and cemeteries -- (1839-1910) Area residents at work and play: hardships settling the County, work activities, and leisure time including: social functions, clubs and organizations, and town picnics and fairs -- Conclusion
Control code
68812610
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
xi, 373 leaves
Form of item
electronic
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • UMKCBorrow it
      800 E 51st St, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.035061 -94.576518
    • Health Sciences LibraryBorrow it
      2411 Holmes St, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 64108, US
      39.083418 -94.575323
    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
Processing Feedback ...