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The Resource Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture. : Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force

Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture. : Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force

Label
Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture. : Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force
Title
Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture.
Title remainder
Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kredel, Nicolas
Dewey number
341.3
LC call number
KZ6396 -- .K74 2006eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Schriften zum Völkerrecht - Band 163
Series volume
v.163
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Civil law -- European Union countries
  • Common law -- United States
  • Intervention (International law)
  • Law -- Language
  • Operation Enduring Freedom, 2001-
  • War (International law)
Label
Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture. : Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Overview -- Content -- Part 1: Introduction -- A. Caveat: Limitations of a Bipolar Approach to Legal Culture -- B. Working Hypothesis - Theory and Method as Genotype and Phenotype of Legal Culture -- 1. Method as the Phenotype of Legal Culture -- 2. Theory as the Genotype of Legal Culture -- Part 2: Civil Law v. U.S. Common Law Culture - A Comparative Analysis -- A. "Consumers" v. "Producers" - The Role of the Judicial Process -- B. Deduction v. Induction - The Way of Legal Reasoning -- C. Logic v. Policy - The Paradigm of Legal Analysis -- 1. Civil Law: The Primacy of Logic -- 2. US Common Law: The Lawyer as a Policy Maker -- 3. Summary -- D. Neutrality v. the Market of Opinions - Procedural Law and Academic Tradition -- E. Form v. Freedom - Formal Constraints in Legal Analysis -- 1. Civil Law -- 2. US Common Law -- 3. Summary -- F. Summary Analysis - Common Law v. Civil Law -- Part 3: Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Examining a Transatlantic Divide -- A. Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Theoretical Approaches -- 1. Traditionalist Positivism, the International Use of Force, and Legal Culture -- a) Traditionalist Positivism's General Assumptions About International Law -- (1) The Objective of International Law Analysis -- (2) Distinct Normative Power and Efficacy of International Law -- (3) Third-Party-Determination of Legality/Justiciability -- b) Traditionalist Positivism and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) The Prohibition of the Use of Force, Voluntarism and ius cogens -- (2) The Prohibition of the International Use of Force in a Hostile Reality -- (3) The Prohibition as a Positive Commitment towards a Value Hierarchy -- c) Summary -- 2. Universal Natural Law and the Use of Force: The Just War Tradition and Legal Culture
  • a) War in Antiquity and the Middle Ages: The Bellum Iustum -- b) The Totalitarian Experience: Reemergence of Natural Law in Criminal Proceedings -- c) Contemporary Natural Law-Based Approaches to the International Use of Force -- (1) The Just War Tradition, Realism and Positivism -- (2) The Just War Tradition and the Presumption Against Violence -- d) Summary -- 3. Reality-Oriented International Legal Theories and Legal Culture -- a) The Realists: Denying a Valid Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- b) Policy-Oriented Jurisprudence: The "New Haven School", Its Disciples, and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) Original Policy-Oriented Jurisprudence -- (2) New Haven-Influenced "Positivists"? -- (3) Summary -- c) International Law/International Relations Theory and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- d) Economic Analysis of International Law and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- e) The Newstream: Postmodern International Law and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) Deconstructivism and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (2) 'Exit Strategies' from Deconstruction and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (3) Summary -- 4. Summary Analysis -- a) Theories on the International Use of Force and Legal Culture -- b) Theories on the International Use of Force and the US-Continental Stereotype -- B. Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Methodological Approaches to Operation" Enduring Freedom" -- 1. Preface: The Facts of 11 September 2001 and Operation "Enduring Freedom" -- 2. Traditionalist Positivist Methodology and Legal Culture -- a) The Structure of Traditionalist Analyses of Operation Enduring Freedom -- b) UN-Charter-based Methodologies -- (1) UN-Charter-Based Methodologies, Legal Culture, and the US-Continental Stereotype
  • (a) The Formalists: Conventional Charter Interpretation -- (b) Subsequent Practice Modifying the Charter Provisions -- (c) Post-Charter Customary International Law Modifying Charter Provisions -- (d) Summary -- (aa) Charter-Based Methodologies and Legal Culture -- (bb) Charter-based Methodologies and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (2) UN Charter-based Methodology and Outcome -- (a) Analyses Regarding "Enduring Freedom" as illegal -- (b) Analyses Asserting the Legality of "Enduring Freedom" -- (c) Analyses Holding for Forceful Action Against Al-Qaeda, but not Against the Taleban -- (d) Summary -- (3) Summary - UN Charter-Based Methodology -- c) Alternative CIL-Based Methodology and Legal Culture -- (1) Justifying "Enduring Freedom" by Necessity -- (2) Intervention by Invitation -- (3) Piracy - Terrorists as New Subjects of International Law -- (4) Forceful Self-Help/Reprisals/Retaliation -- (5) Summary -- d) Summary Analysis - Traditionalist Methodology, Legal Culture and Outcome -- (1) Traditionalist Methodology and Legal Culture -- (2) Traditionalist Methodology and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) Traditionalist Methodology and Outcome -- 3. Natural Law-Based Methodology and Legal Culture: The Just War Tradition -- a) Determining Which Cause is Just -- (1) Just Cause as Defined by the Responsible Authority -- (2) Just Cause as the Smallest Common Denominator -- b) Limits on the Conduct of War -- c) Summary Analysis - The Just War Tradition, Legal Culture, Stereotypes and Outcome -- (1) The Just War Tradition and Legal Culture -- (2) The Just War Tradition and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) The Just War Tradition and Outcome -- 4. Reality-Oriented Methodology and Legal Culture -- a) "Policy-Guided" Methodology - Between Positive Law and Policy-Decisions -- b) Policy-Oriented Methodology - The New Haven School and Its Disciples
  • (1) New Haven Scholars and Forceful Counter-Terrorism -- (2) New Haven's Disciples: Legal Realist "Positivism" -- (3) Summary Analysis -- c) Interdisciplinary Methodology - International Relations Theory, International Law and "Enduring Freedom" -- d) Realist Methodology and "Enduring Freedom" -- e) "Reconstructive" Legal Feminism and "Enduring Freedom" -- f) Summary - Reality-Oriented Methodologies -- (1) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and Legal Culture -- (2) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and Outcome -- 5. Summary Analysis - Operation "Enduring Freedom", Methodology, and Legal Culture -- a) Legal Culture and Method -- b) Legal Culture, Method and the US-Continental Stereotype -- c) Legal Culture, Method and the Outcome of Legal Analysis -- C. Conclusion - The Fragmentation of International Legal Culture: A Reason for the Transatlantic Divide -- 1. Legal Culture shapes Legal Theory on the International Use of Force -- 2. Legal Culture shapes International Lawyers' Method of Legal Analysis -- 3. Reality does not always confirm the Cultural Stereotype -- 4. Legal Culture shapes the Outcome of Legal Analysis -- 5. Civil Law Culture tends to preserve, US Common Law Culture tends to undermine the Charter System of Collective Security -- 6. Civil Law Culture tends to accommodate a Kelsenian, US Common Law a Hobbesian Worldview -- Part 4: The Fragmentation of Legal Culture and Future Transatlantic International Legal Discourse -- A. Cultural Fragmentation and the International Legal Discourse -- B. Bridging the Transatlantic Divide - Taking Legal Culture Seriously -- Abstract -- Zusammenfassung -- References -- Press, Speeches -- Documents -- Table of Cases -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1117791
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (264 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783428519491
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1117791
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1117791
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10573633
  • (OCoLC)828300559
Label
Operation "Enduring Freedom" and the Fragmentation of International Legal Culture. : Comparing US Common Law and Civil Law Perspectives on the International Use of Force
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Overview -- Content -- Part 1: Introduction -- A. Caveat: Limitations of a Bipolar Approach to Legal Culture -- B. Working Hypothesis - Theory and Method as Genotype and Phenotype of Legal Culture -- 1. Method as the Phenotype of Legal Culture -- 2. Theory as the Genotype of Legal Culture -- Part 2: Civil Law v. U.S. Common Law Culture - A Comparative Analysis -- A. "Consumers" v. "Producers" - The Role of the Judicial Process -- B. Deduction v. Induction - The Way of Legal Reasoning -- C. Logic v. Policy - The Paradigm of Legal Analysis -- 1. Civil Law: The Primacy of Logic -- 2. US Common Law: The Lawyer as a Policy Maker -- 3. Summary -- D. Neutrality v. the Market of Opinions - Procedural Law and Academic Tradition -- E. Form v. Freedom - Formal Constraints in Legal Analysis -- 1. Civil Law -- 2. US Common Law -- 3. Summary -- F. Summary Analysis - Common Law v. Civil Law -- Part 3: Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Examining a Transatlantic Divide -- A. Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Theoretical Approaches -- 1. Traditionalist Positivism, the International Use of Force, and Legal Culture -- a) Traditionalist Positivism's General Assumptions About International Law -- (1) The Objective of International Law Analysis -- (2) Distinct Normative Power and Efficacy of International Law -- (3) Third-Party-Determination of Legality/Justiciability -- b) Traditionalist Positivism and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) The Prohibition of the Use of Force, Voluntarism and ius cogens -- (2) The Prohibition of the International Use of Force in a Hostile Reality -- (3) The Prohibition as a Positive Commitment towards a Value Hierarchy -- c) Summary -- 2. Universal Natural Law and the Use of Force: The Just War Tradition and Legal Culture
  • a) War in Antiquity and the Middle Ages: The Bellum Iustum -- b) The Totalitarian Experience: Reemergence of Natural Law in Criminal Proceedings -- c) Contemporary Natural Law-Based Approaches to the International Use of Force -- (1) The Just War Tradition, Realism and Positivism -- (2) The Just War Tradition and the Presumption Against Violence -- d) Summary -- 3. Reality-Oriented International Legal Theories and Legal Culture -- a) The Realists: Denying a Valid Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- b) Policy-Oriented Jurisprudence: The "New Haven School", Its Disciples, and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) Original Policy-Oriented Jurisprudence -- (2) New Haven-Influenced "Positivists"? -- (3) Summary -- c) International Law/International Relations Theory and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- d) Economic Analysis of International Law and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- e) The Newstream: Postmodern International Law and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (1) Deconstructivism and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (2) 'Exit Strategies' from Deconstruction and the Prohibition of the International Use of Force -- (3) Summary -- 4. Summary Analysis -- a) Theories on the International Use of Force and Legal Culture -- b) Theories on the International Use of Force and the US-Continental Stereotype -- B. Legal Culture and the International Use of Force - Methodological Approaches to Operation" Enduring Freedom" -- 1. Preface: The Facts of 11 September 2001 and Operation "Enduring Freedom" -- 2. Traditionalist Positivist Methodology and Legal Culture -- a) The Structure of Traditionalist Analyses of Operation Enduring Freedom -- b) UN-Charter-based Methodologies -- (1) UN-Charter-Based Methodologies, Legal Culture, and the US-Continental Stereotype
  • (a) The Formalists: Conventional Charter Interpretation -- (b) Subsequent Practice Modifying the Charter Provisions -- (c) Post-Charter Customary International Law Modifying Charter Provisions -- (d) Summary -- (aa) Charter-Based Methodologies and Legal Culture -- (bb) Charter-based Methodologies and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (2) UN Charter-based Methodology and Outcome -- (a) Analyses Regarding "Enduring Freedom" as illegal -- (b) Analyses Asserting the Legality of "Enduring Freedom" -- (c) Analyses Holding for Forceful Action Against Al-Qaeda, but not Against the Taleban -- (d) Summary -- (3) Summary - UN Charter-Based Methodology -- c) Alternative CIL-Based Methodology and Legal Culture -- (1) Justifying "Enduring Freedom" by Necessity -- (2) Intervention by Invitation -- (3) Piracy - Terrorists as New Subjects of International Law -- (4) Forceful Self-Help/Reprisals/Retaliation -- (5) Summary -- d) Summary Analysis - Traditionalist Methodology, Legal Culture and Outcome -- (1) Traditionalist Methodology and Legal Culture -- (2) Traditionalist Methodology and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) Traditionalist Methodology and Outcome -- 3. Natural Law-Based Methodology and Legal Culture: The Just War Tradition -- a) Determining Which Cause is Just -- (1) Just Cause as Defined by the Responsible Authority -- (2) Just Cause as the Smallest Common Denominator -- b) Limits on the Conduct of War -- c) Summary Analysis - The Just War Tradition, Legal Culture, Stereotypes and Outcome -- (1) The Just War Tradition and Legal Culture -- (2) The Just War Tradition and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) The Just War Tradition and Outcome -- 4. Reality-Oriented Methodology and Legal Culture -- a) "Policy-Guided" Methodology - Between Positive Law and Policy-Decisions -- b) Policy-Oriented Methodology - The New Haven School and Its Disciples
  • (1) New Haven Scholars and Forceful Counter-Terrorism -- (2) New Haven's Disciples: Legal Realist "Positivism" -- (3) Summary Analysis -- c) Interdisciplinary Methodology - International Relations Theory, International Law and "Enduring Freedom" -- d) Realist Methodology and "Enduring Freedom" -- e) "Reconstructive" Legal Feminism and "Enduring Freedom" -- f) Summary - Reality-Oriented Methodologies -- (1) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and Legal Culture -- (2) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and the US-Continental Stereotype -- (3) Reality-Oriented Methodologies and Outcome -- 5. Summary Analysis - Operation "Enduring Freedom", Methodology, and Legal Culture -- a) Legal Culture and Method -- b) Legal Culture, Method and the US-Continental Stereotype -- c) Legal Culture, Method and the Outcome of Legal Analysis -- C. Conclusion - The Fragmentation of International Legal Culture: A Reason for the Transatlantic Divide -- 1. Legal Culture shapes Legal Theory on the International Use of Force -- 2. Legal Culture shapes International Lawyers' Method of Legal Analysis -- 3. Reality does not always confirm the Cultural Stereotype -- 4. Legal Culture shapes the Outcome of Legal Analysis -- 5. Civil Law Culture tends to preserve, US Common Law Culture tends to undermine the Charter System of Collective Security -- 6. Civil Law Culture tends to accommodate a Kelsenian, US Common Law a Hobbesian Worldview -- Part 4: The Fragmentation of Legal Culture and Future Transatlantic International Legal Discourse -- A. Cultural Fragmentation and the International Legal Discourse -- B. Bridging the Transatlantic Divide - Taking Legal Culture Seriously -- Abstract -- Zusammenfassung -- References -- Press, Speeches -- Documents -- Table of Cases -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1117791
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (264 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783428519491
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1117791
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1117791
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10573633
  • (OCoLC)828300559

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