Coverart for item
The Resource Mestizo International Law : A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933

Mestizo International Law : A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933

Label
Mestizo International Law : A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933
Title
Mestizo International Law
Title remainder
A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1971-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Becker Lorca, Arnulf
Dewey number
341.09/034
LC call number
KZ1242 -- .B435 2014eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law
Series volume
v.115
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • International law -- History
  • Legal polycentricity
Label
Mestizo International Law : A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half title -- Series -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of maps -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Part I: Mestizo international law -- 1 Why a global intellectual history of international law? -- An intellectual history: ideas to change rules -- Seen from the peripheries -- A mestizo international law -- Between centre and periphery, between the international and the local -- The semi-peripheral finds an own voice and the core jurist becomes anxious: the debate about international law's origin -- A history of two semi-peripheral sensibilities -- Part II: Universal international law -- 2 Appropriating classical legal thought -- From geographical expansion to a universal international law -- Unequal regimes in nineteenth-century international law -- Semi-peripheral jurists -- The semi-peripheral appropriation of classical international law -- A profession beyond the West -- Positivism -- Absolute sovereignty -- The standard of civilization -- A critique of the standard -- 3 The imposition and negotiation of rules: hybridity and functional equivalences -- Three types of international regimes -- The Ottoman capitulations -- The Chinese 'treaty port system' -- General treaties of peace, commerce and navigation in Latin America -- The Turkish, Chinese and Latin American regimes compared -- 4 The expansion of nineteenth-century international law as circulation -- Inclusion of newly independent states through recognition -- Western expansion through the forceful opening of weakened empires -- Japan -- China -- Inclusion in the 'family of civilized nations' through re-admission -- The Ottoman Empire -- Russia -- The expansion of international law as circulation -- The meaning of universality in public international law -- Part III: The fall of classical thought and the turn to modern international law
  • 5 Sovereignty beyond the West: the end of classical international law -- The limits of sovereign autonomy: Luis Drago and the Venezuelan blockade of 1902 -- A right of intervention in the law of international claims -- Limiting the scope of intervention: no use of force to collect public debt -- The limits of sovereign equality: Ruy Barbosa at the Second Hague Conference of 1907 -- A permanent international court -- Absolute equality: a demand within classical international law -- Japan between the revision of unequal treaties in the 1890s and the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 -- Taxing perpetual leases: the limits of Japanese sovereignty -- Paris Peace Conference of 1919: no racial equality in the League of Nations -- The 'arrogance' of the newcomers -- The Second Hague Conference: modern sovereignty -- A new debate: the sovereign equality of semi-peripheral states -- Equality versus inequality -- Equality in a new international law -- Formalism versus pragmatism -- Absolute versus relative equality -- The turn to modern international law in the semi-periphery -- 6 Modern international law: good news for the semi-periphery? -- The European affair and the rules for the semi-periphery -- A critique of sovereignty with imperialistic overtones: Politis -- Interdependence and social duties as new grounds for intervention: Lapradelle and Basdevant -- Part IV: Modern international law -- 7 Petitioning the international: a 'pre-history' of self-determination -- Petitioning at the Peace Conference, Paris, 1919 -- The reconstruction of international law in the semi-periphery -- Petitioning for self-government: from Paris to Geneva, from civilization to statehood -- 'We have a civilization' (rather than: 'we have met the standard of civilization') -- Change of circumstances: a new international order after the Great War
  • Destabilizing the civilized/uncivilized divide -- After the defeat of self-determination, statehood -- 8 Circumventing self-determination: League membership and armed resistance -- Membership in the League of Nations -- Requesting admission at the First Assembly: independence, statehood and recognition -- Requesting admission after the First Assembly: Ethiopia and the Six Nations -- Acquiring statehood by force: the Syrian uprising and the French bombardment of Damascus -- 9 Codifying American international law: statehood and non-intervention -- Why to codify under modern international law? -- Codifiers at the centre and the semi-periphery:the 'crisis of codification' -- State responsibility: the Hague Conference again blocked by the semi-peripherals -- The Guerrero report -- The semi-peripheral challenge: Guerrero, Sipsom and Wu -- Codifying international law in the new world: the long road to Montevideo -- Pan-American codification -- Formal statehood and declaratory recognition -- Non-intervention -- Montevideo, 1933 -- Conclusion -- Appendices -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1823574
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (422 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781316205204
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1823574
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1823574
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11003399
  • (OCoLC)898770291
Label
Mestizo International Law : A Global Intellectual History 1842-1933
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half title -- Series -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of maps -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Part I: Mestizo international law -- 1 Why a global intellectual history of international law? -- An intellectual history: ideas to change rules -- Seen from the peripheries -- A mestizo international law -- Between centre and periphery, between the international and the local -- The semi-peripheral finds an own voice and the core jurist becomes anxious: the debate about international law's origin -- A history of two semi-peripheral sensibilities -- Part II: Universal international law -- 2 Appropriating classical legal thought -- From geographical expansion to a universal international law -- Unequal regimes in nineteenth-century international law -- Semi-peripheral jurists -- The semi-peripheral appropriation of classical international law -- A profession beyond the West -- Positivism -- Absolute sovereignty -- The standard of civilization -- A critique of the standard -- 3 The imposition and negotiation of rules: hybridity and functional equivalences -- Three types of international regimes -- The Ottoman capitulations -- The Chinese 'treaty port system' -- General treaties of peace, commerce and navigation in Latin America -- The Turkish, Chinese and Latin American regimes compared -- 4 The expansion of nineteenth-century international law as circulation -- Inclusion of newly independent states through recognition -- Western expansion through the forceful opening of weakened empires -- Japan -- China -- Inclusion in the 'family of civilized nations' through re-admission -- The Ottoman Empire -- Russia -- The expansion of international law as circulation -- The meaning of universality in public international law -- Part III: The fall of classical thought and the turn to modern international law
  • 5 Sovereignty beyond the West: the end of classical international law -- The limits of sovereign autonomy: Luis Drago and the Venezuelan blockade of 1902 -- A right of intervention in the law of international claims -- Limiting the scope of intervention: no use of force to collect public debt -- The limits of sovereign equality: Ruy Barbosa at the Second Hague Conference of 1907 -- A permanent international court -- Absolute equality: a demand within classical international law -- Japan between the revision of unequal treaties in the 1890s and the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 -- Taxing perpetual leases: the limits of Japanese sovereignty -- Paris Peace Conference of 1919: no racial equality in the League of Nations -- The 'arrogance' of the newcomers -- The Second Hague Conference: modern sovereignty -- A new debate: the sovereign equality of semi-peripheral states -- Equality versus inequality -- Equality in a new international law -- Formalism versus pragmatism -- Absolute versus relative equality -- The turn to modern international law in the semi-periphery -- 6 Modern international law: good news for the semi-periphery? -- The European affair and the rules for the semi-periphery -- A critique of sovereignty with imperialistic overtones: Politis -- Interdependence and social duties as new grounds for intervention: Lapradelle and Basdevant -- Part IV: Modern international law -- 7 Petitioning the international: a 'pre-history' of self-determination -- Petitioning at the Peace Conference, Paris, 1919 -- The reconstruction of international law in the semi-periphery -- Petitioning for self-government: from Paris to Geneva, from civilization to statehood -- 'We have a civilization' (rather than: 'we have met the standard of civilization') -- Change of circumstances: a new international order after the Great War
  • Destabilizing the civilized/uncivilized divide -- After the defeat of self-determination, statehood -- 8 Circumventing self-determination: League membership and armed resistance -- Membership in the League of Nations -- Requesting admission at the First Assembly: independence, statehood and recognition -- Requesting admission after the First Assembly: Ethiopia and the Six Nations -- Acquiring statehood by force: the Syrian uprising and the French bombardment of Damascus -- 9 Codifying American international law: statehood and non-intervention -- Why to codify under modern international law? -- Codifiers at the centre and the semi-periphery:the 'crisis of codification' -- State responsibility: the Hague Conference again blocked by the semi-peripherals -- The Guerrero report -- The semi-peripheral challenge: Guerrero, Sipsom and Wu -- Codifying international law in the new world: the long road to Montevideo -- Pan-American codification -- Formal statehood and declaratory recognition -- Non-intervention -- Montevideo, 1933 -- Conclusion -- Appendices -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1823574
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (422 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781316205204
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1823574
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1823574
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11003399
  • (OCoLC)898770291

Library Locations

    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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