The Resource Hidden dragon, crouching lion : how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated, David E. Brown, (electronic resource)

Hidden dragon, crouching lion : how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated, David E. Brown, (electronic resource)

Label
Hidden dragon, crouching lion : how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated
Title
Hidden dragon, crouching lion
Title remainder
how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated
Statement of responsibility
David E. Brown
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The explosive growth of China's economic interests in Africa -- bilateral trade rocketed from $1 billion in 1990 to $150 billion in 2011 -- may be the most important trend in the continent's foreign relations since the end of the Cold War. In 2010, China surpassed the United States as Africa's top trading partner; its quest to build a strategic partnership with Africa on own its terms through tied aid, trade, and development finance is also part of Beijing's broader aspirations to surpass the United States as the world's preeminent superpower. Africa and other emerging economies have become attractive partners for China not only for natural resources, but as growing markets. Africa's rapid growth since 2000 has not just occurred because of higher commodity prices, but more importantly due to other factors including improved governance, economic reforms, and an expanding labor force. China's rapid and successful expansion in Africa is due to multiple factors, including economic diplomacy that is clearly superior to that of the United States. China's "no strings attached" approach to development, however, risks undoing decades of Western efforts to promote good governance. Consequently, this monograph examines China's oil diplomacy, equity investments in strategic minerals, and food policy toward Africa. The official U.S. rhetoric is that China's rise in Africa should not be seen as a zero-sum game, but areas where real U.S.-China cooperation can help Africa remain elusive, mainly because of Beijing's hyper-mistrust of Washington. The United States could help itself, and Africa, by improving its own economic diplomacy and adequately funding its own soft-power efforts
Member of
Cataloging source
AWC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brown, David E.
Government publication
federal national government publication
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Army War College (U.S.)
Series statement
Strategic Studies Institute monograph
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Investments, Chinese
  • China
  • Africa
  • China
  • Africa
  • China
  • Africa
Label
Hidden dragon, crouching lion : how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated, David E. Brown, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"September 2012."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 99-114)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Summary -- Pt. I. China leads the developing world in fostering economic ties to Africa. The hidden dragon : China's main interests in Africa and place in the world -- Africa : aiding China's peaceful rise as a superpower -- Other BRICs and the developing world also interested in Africa -- Ten years of successful Africa-China trade : the dragon flies more swiftly than the eagle -- China's foreign direct investment in Africa : large, but estimates differ -- Pt. II. Major questions in the China-Africa economic relationship. Why did China choose to expand its economic ties to Africa? -- The push with China : 1993 shift to oil importer leads to linkage of aid/trade; 2001 WTO accession leads to "going-out" policy -- Factors in China's success in rapidly expanding economic ties with Africa -- Are Africa's new debts to China sustainable? -- Will Africa be able to industrialize because of or despite China? -- China is not a monolith : impact of nonstate Chinese actors on Africa -- Official China recognizes damage in Africa caused by poor corporate citizens -- African civil society acts to constrain poor Chinese behavior, but muzzled Chinese civil society cannot lobby Beijing for change -- The Chinese diaspora : latest large wave impacting Africa -- Pt. III. China's strategic ties to Africa : oil, minerals, and agriculture. China and oil diplomacy in Africa -- China's strategic trade in metals and minerals in Africa : implications for the United States -- China, Africa, and agriculture : food as the next strategic asset? -- Pt. IV. U.S. responses to China in Africa. Potential for U.S.-China cooperation in Africa : limited and constrained by Beijing -- Conclusion : recommendations for U.S. policymakers
Control code
810088306
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (x, 114 pages).
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Hidden dragon, crouching lion : how China's advance in Africa is underestimated and Africa's potential underappreciated, David E. Brown, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
"September 2012."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 99-114)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Summary -- Pt. I. China leads the developing world in fostering economic ties to Africa. The hidden dragon : China's main interests in Africa and place in the world -- Africa : aiding China's peaceful rise as a superpower -- Other BRICs and the developing world also interested in Africa -- Ten years of successful Africa-China trade : the dragon flies more swiftly than the eagle -- China's foreign direct investment in Africa : large, but estimates differ -- Pt. II. Major questions in the China-Africa economic relationship. Why did China choose to expand its economic ties to Africa? -- The push with China : 1993 shift to oil importer leads to linkage of aid/trade; 2001 WTO accession leads to "going-out" policy -- Factors in China's success in rapidly expanding economic ties with Africa -- Are Africa's new debts to China sustainable? -- Will Africa be able to industrialize because of or despite China? -- China is not a monolith : impact of nonstate Chinese actors on Africa -- Official China recognizes damage in Africa caused by poor corporate citizens -- African civil society acts to constrain poor Chinese behavior, but muzzled Chinese civil society cannot lobby Beijing for change -- The Chinese diaspora : latest large wave impacting Africa -- Pt. III. China's strategic ties to Africa : oil, minerals, and agriculture. China and oil diplomacy in Africa -- China's strategic trade in metals and minerals in Africa : implications for the United States -- China, Africa, and agriculture : food as the next strategic asset? -- Pt. IV. U.S. responses to China in Africa. Potential for U.S.-China cooperation in Africa : limited and constrained by Beijing -- Conclusion : recommendations for U.S. policymakers
Control code
810088306
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (x, 114 pages).
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote

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