Coverart for item
The Resource Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition : Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority

Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition : Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority

Label
Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition : Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority
Title
Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition
Title remainder
Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Goldman, David B
Dewey number
340.52
LC call number
K150 -- .G65 2007eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Law in Context
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Electronic books. -- local
  • Globalization
  • Law -- Europe -- History
  • Law -- History
  • Law -- International unification
  • Law -- Philosophy -- History
Label
Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition : Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Western legal tradition -- 1.1.1 'Western' -- 1.1.2 'Legal' -- 1.1.3 'Tradition' -- 1.1.4 A world legal tradition? -- 1.2 Patterns of law and authority: from the celestial to the terrestrial -- 1.3 Grand theory in the human sciences -- 1.4 General jurisprudence -- 1.5 Danger and opportunity -- 1.6 Key issues in globalisation and legal theory -- Part 1 Towards a Globalist Jurisprudence -- 2 Globalisation and the World Revolution -- 2.1 Grappling with globalisation -- 2.1.1 Symbols and political change -- 2.1.2 History -- 2.1.3 Definition and context -- 2.1.4 Operation -- 2.2 Globalisation and legal categories -- 2.2.1 Private international law globalisation -- 2.2.2 Public international law globalisation -- 2.3 Globalisation as an integrative concept -- 2.3.1 'Sovereign egg-shells' and the 'global community omelette' -- 2.3.2 Competing jurisdictions and legal pluralism -- 2.3.3 The multinational enterprise -- 2.3.4 World society -- 2.4 The sphere of containable disruption -- 2.4.1 Technological influences on sovereignty -- 2.4.2 Common heritage of humankind -- 2.4.3 New challenges and new spheres -- 2.5 The 'World Revolution' and legal theory -- 3 Law and authority in space and time -- 3.1 Normative foundations of a historical jurisprudence -- 3.1.1 Ultimate reality and meaning -- 3.1.2 Social activity as autobiography -- 3.2 The Space-Time Matrix -- 3.2.1 The Space Axis: personal morality versus politics -- 3.2.2 The Time Axis: past versus future -- 3.3 Law as culture (nomos) and reason (logos) -- 3.3.1 Nomos as cultural law -- 3.3.2 Logos as rational law -- 3.3.3 Reconciling cultural and rational laws -- 3.4 Law as autobiography in a global world -- Part 2 A Holy Roman Empire -- 4 The original European community
  • 4.1 A rhetorical 'holy Roman empire' -- 4.2 Tribalism -- 4.3 Charlemagne's short-lived political universalism -- 4.4 Christian moral and political universalism -- 4.4.1 Peter's papal legacy -- 4.4.2 'Two Swords' legal pluralism -- 4.5 Feudal moral and political diversity -- 4.5.1 Ritual, meaning and time -- 4.5.2 Parcellised sovereignty, economy and space -- 4.6 Lessons for a globalist jurisprudence -- 5 Universal law and the Papal Revolution -- 5.1 Apocalypse -- 5.2 The Papal Revolution -- 5.2.1 Space: the reconciliation of morality and politics -- 5.2.2 Time: the pursuit of heaven on earth -- 5.3 Papal supranationality -- 5.3.1 Non-territorially defined jurisdiction -- 5.3.2 Competing jurisdictions -- 5.4 Legal education and practice in a universe of meaning -- 5.5 Threshold characteristics of the Western legal tradition -- Part 3 State Formation and Reformation -- 6 Territorial law and the rise of the state -- 6.1 The birth of the state -- 6.2 Legal diversity and universality in the emerging European states -- 6.2.1 Germany -- 6.2.2 England -- 6.2.3 The diffusion of European common law -- 6.3 The decline of the Christian commonwealth -- 6.3.1 The post-scholastic period -- 6.3.2 The renaissance -- 6.4 The arrival of the state -- 6.4.1 The Peace of Westphalia -- 6.4.2 Territorial consolidation and the decline of universality -- 6.5 Lessons for a globalist jurisprudence -- 7 The reformation of state authority -- 7.1 The neglect of the Protestant Reformations by legal theory -- 7.2 Supranationality legislation prior to the Reformations -- 7.3 From 'Two Swords' to single sword sovereignty -- 7.3.1 The English experience under Henry VIII -- 7.3.2 The general Western experience -- 7.4 Protestant legal authority -- 7.4.1 German legal philosophy -- 7.4.2 English legal philosophy -- 7.5 Understanding the legislative mentality
  • 7.6 Religion, Mammon and the spirit of capitalism -- 7.6.1 Outgoing God in the Last Supper -- 7.6.2 Incoming Mammon in the spirit of capitalism -- 7.7 Demystification and globalist jurisprudence -- Part 4 A Wholly Mammon Empire? -- 8 The constricted universalism of the nation-state -- 8.1 Universalism in a different guise -- 8.2 The secularisation of international law: European public law -- 8.3 The secularisation of the economy -- 8.4 The French juristic vision -- 8.4.1 Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen -- 8.4.2 The rational, contracting, productive individual -- 8.4.3 The codification mentality -- 8.4.4 Enlightenment legal science -- 8.4.5 Rebellion from the Historical School -- 8.4.6 Bentham and the codification mentality -- 8.5 The struggle for European community -- 8.6 Globalist jurisprudence and the Enlightenment -- 9 The incomplete authority of the nation-state -- 9.1 The cultural foundation of the nation -- 9.1.1 Language and nation -- 9.1.2 Industrialisation and nation -- 9.1.3 Race and nation -- 9.1.4 Retrospection and nation -- 9.2 Logical aspects of the modern state -- 9.3 The problematic hyphenation of the nation-state -- 9.3.1 The Historical-National School -- 9.3.2 The Contractarian School -- 9.3.3 Moral and political implications -- 9.4 Friendship and self-interest as sources of global allegiance -- 9.4.1 Nation and state as aspects of friendship -- 9.4.2 The shared self-interest of trade -- 9.5 On the way to authorities differently conceived -- 10 The return of universalist law: human rights and free trade -- 10.1 The quest for order in the World Revolution -- 10.1.1 Background interconnections -- 10.1.2 The World Wars -- 10.1.3 The re-gathering of the European community -- 10.2 The global hegemony of the USA -- 10.3 The preambling quest for human solidarity -- 10.3.1 The United Nations
  • 10.3.2 International criminal adjudication -- 10.3.3 The IMF and World Bank -- 10.3.4 The European Communities -- 10.3.5 The community that jurisprudence rebuilds? -- 10.4 Universal human rights -- 10.4.1 Patterns of ultimate reality and meaning -- 10.4.2 From equality of souls (eleventh century) to equality of bodies (twentieth century) -- 10.4.3 Cultural relativism: universality versus diversity -- 10.4.4 Reconciling logical and customary norms - a global ethic -- 10.5 Free trade -- 10.5.1 The dogma -- 10.5.2 The discourse -- 10.6 Globalist jurisprudence, God and Mammon -- Part 5 Competing Jurisdictions Case Studies -- 11 The twenty-first century European community -- 11.1 The reconstitution of the European community -- 11.1.1 Background initiatives -- 11.1.2 Treaty establishing the European Community -- 11.1.3 Treaty on European Union -- 11.1.4 Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe -- 11.2 EU higher laws -- 11.2.1 Direct effect -- 11.2.2 Supremacy -- 11.2.3 Implied powers -- 11.2.4 Human rights -- 11.2.5 Subsidiarity -- 11.2.6 Civil society freedoms -- 11.3 Before and beyond the nation-state: international law as constitutional law -- 11.4 Supranationality and the 'democratic deficit' -- 11.5 Political versus cultural community -- 11.6 The global significance of the EU -- 12 International commercial law and private governance -- 12.1 The lex mercatoria -- 12.1.1 Definition -- 12.1.2 History -- 12.1.3 The nature of the 'new' lex mercatoria -- 12.1.4 Codification -- 12.2 European contract law and codification -- 12.2.1 Synthetic aspects -- 12.2.2 Organic aspects -- 12.3 Contract and private governance -- 12.3.1 Arbitration -- 12.3.2 Contractual authority as private government -- 12.4 Private authority and globalist jurisprudence -- 13 Conclusion: what is to be done?
  • 13.1 Lions and dragons: revisiting celestial and terrestrial patterns of authority -- 13.1.1 The original European community -- 13.1.2 The rise of the state -- 13.1.3 The economic particularity of the nation-state -- 13.1.4 The rise of world society -- 13.2 Revisiting the concept of globalisation -- 13.3 Some implications for legal education and practice -- 13.3.1 The contingency of law and justice -- 13.3.2 Speed as virtue -- 13.3.3 Time for generalities -- 13.4 The importance of historical consciousness today -- 13.4.1 Integrative jurisprudence -- 13.4.2 Justifying authority: a romantic lesson -- 13.5 Is there anything new under the sun? -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC412766
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (378 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780511477218
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC412766
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL412766
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10279718
  • (OCoLC)437089922
Label
Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition : Recurring Patterns of Law and Authority
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Western legal tradition -- 1.1.1 'Western' -- 1.1.2 'Legal' -- 1.1.3 'Tradition' -- 1.1.4 A world legal tradition? -- 1.2 Patterns of law and authority: from the celestial to the terrestrial -- 1.3 Grand theory in the human sciences -- 1.4 General jurisprudence -- 1.5 Danger and opportunity -- 1.6 Key issues in globalisation and legal theory -- Part 1 Towards a Globalist Jurisprudence -- 2 Globalisation and the World Revolution -- 2.1 Grappling with globalisation -- 2.1.1 Symbols and political change -- 2.1.2 History -- 2.1.3 Definition and context -- 2.1.4 Operation -- 2.2 Globalisation and legal categories -- 2.2.1 Private international law globalisation -- 2.2.2 Public international law globalisation -- 2.3 Globalisation as an integrative concept -- 2.3.1 'Sovereign egg-shells' and the 'global community omelette' -- 2.3.2 Competing jurisdictions and legal pluralism -- 2.3.3 The multinational enterprise -- 2.3.4 World society -- 2.4 The sphere of containable disruption -- 2.4.1 Technological influences on sovereignty -- 2.4.2 Common heritage of humankind -- 2.4.3 New challenges and new spheres -- 2.5 The 'World Revolution' and legal theory -- 3 Law and authority in space and time -- 3.1 Normative foundations of a historical jurisprudence -- 3.1.1 Ultimate reality and meaning -- 3.1.2 Social activity as autobiography -- 3.2 The Space-Time Matrix -- 3.2.1 The Space Axis: personal morality versus politics -- 3.2.2 The Time Axis: past versus future -- 3.3 Law as culture (nomos) and reason (logos) -- 3.3.1 Nomos as cultural law -- 3.3.2 Logos as rational law -- 3.3.3 Reconciling cultural and rational laws -- 3.4 Law as autobiography in a global world -- Part 2 A Holy Roman Empire -- 4 The original European community
  • 4.1 A rhetorical 'holy Roman empire' -- 4.2 Tribalism -- 4.3 Charlemagne's short-lived political universalism -- 4.4 Christian moral and political universalism -- 4.4.1 Peter's papal legacy -- 4.4.2 'Two Swords' legal pluralism -- 4.5 Feudal moral and political diversity -- 4.5.1 Ritual, meaning and time -- 4.5.2 Parcellised sovereignty, economy and space -- 4.6 Lessons for a globalist jurisprudence -- 5 Universal law and the Papal Revolution -- 5.1 Apocalypse -- 5.2 The Papal Revolution -- 5.2.1 Space: the reconciliation of morality and politics -- 5.2.2 Time: the pursuit of heaven on earth -- 5.3 Papal supranationality -- 5.3.1 Non-territorially defined jurisdiction -- 5.3.2 Competing jurisdictions -- 5.4 Legal education and practice in a universe of meaning -- 5.5 Threshold characteristics of the Western legal tradition -- Part 3 State Formation and Reformation -- 6 Territorial law and the rise of the state -- 6.1 The birth of the state -- 6.2 Legal diversity and universality in the emerging European states -- 6.2.1 Germany -- 6.2.2 England -- 6.2.3 The diffusion of European common law -- 6.3 The decline of the Christian commonwealth -- 6.3.1 The post-scholastic period -- 6.3.2 The renaissance -- 6.4 The arrival of the state -- 6.4.1 The Peace of Westphalia -- 6.4.2 Territorial consolidation and the decline of universality -- 6.5 Lessons for a globalist jurisprudence -- 7 The reformation of state authority -- 7.1 The neglect of the Protestant Reformations by legal theory -- 7.2 Supranationality legislation prior to the Reformations -- 7.3 From 'Two Swords' to single sword sovereignty -- 7.3.1 The English experience under Henry VIII -- 7.3.2 The general Western experience -- 7.4 Protestant legal authority -- 7.4.1 German legal philosophy -- 7.4.2 English legal philosophy -- 7.5 Understanding the legislative mentality
  • 7.6 Religion, Mammon and the spirit of capitalism -- 7.6.1 Outgoing God in the Last Supper -- 7.6.2 Incoming Mammon in the spirit of capitalism -- 7.7 Demystification and globalist jurisprudence -- Part 4 A Wholly Mammon Empire? -- 8 The constricted universalism of the nation-state -- 8.1 Universalism in a different guise -- 8.2 The secularisation of international law: European public law -- 8.3 The secularisation of the economy -- 8.4 The French juristic vision -- 8.4.1 Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen -- 8.4.2 The rational, contracting, productive individual -- 8.4.3 The codification mentality -- 8.4.4 Enlightenment legal science -- 8.4.5 Rebellion from the Historical School -- 8.4.6 Bentham and the codification mentality -- 8.5 The struggle for European community -- 8.6 Globalist jurisprudence and the Enlightenment -- 9 The incomplete authority of the nation-state -- 9.1 The cultural foundation of the nation -- 9.1.1 Language and nation -- 9.1.2 Industrialisation and nation -- 9.1.3 Race and nation -- 9.1.4 Retrospection and nation -- 9.2 Logical aspects of the modern state -- 9.3 The problematic hyphenation of the nation-state -- 9.3.1 The Historical-National School -- 9.3.2 The Contractarian School -- 9.3.3 Moral and political implications -- 9.4 Friendship and self-interest as sources of global allegiance -- 9.4.1 Nation and state as aspects of friendship -- 9.4.2 The shared self-interest of trade -- 9.5 On the way to authorities differently conceived -- 10 The return of universalist law: human rights and free trade -- 10.1 The quest for order in the World Revolution -- 10.1.1 Background interconnections -- 10.1.2 The World Wars -- 10.1.3 The re-gathering of the European community -- 10.2 The global hegemony of the USA -- 10.3 The preambling quest for human solidarity -- 10.3.1 The United Nations
  • 10.3.2 International criminal adjudication -- 10.3.3 The IMF and World Bank -- 10.3.4 The European Communities -- 10.3.5 The community that jurisprudence rebuilds? -- 10.4 Universal human rights -- 10.4.1 Patterns of ultimate reality and meaning -- 10.4.2 From equality of souls (eleventh century) to equality of bodies (twentieth century) -- 10.4.3 Cultural relativism: universality versus diversity -- 10.4.4 Reconciling logical and customary norms - a global ethic -- 10.5 Free trade -- 10.5.1 The dogma -- 10.5.2 The discourse -- 10.6 Globalist jurisprudence, God and Mammon -- Part 5 Competing Jurisdictions Case Studies -- 11 The twenty-first century European community -- 11.1 The reconstitution of the European community -- 11.1.1 Background initiatives -- 11.1.2 Treaty establishing the European Community -- 11.1.3 Treaty on European Union -- 11.1.4 Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe -- 11.2 EU higher laws -- 11.2.1 Direct effect -- 11.2.2 Supremacy -- 11.2.3 Implied powers -- 11.2.4 Human rights -- 11.2.5 Subsidiarity -- 11.2.6 Civil society freedoms -- 11.3 Before and beyond the nation-state: international law as constitutional law -- 11.4 Supranationality and the 'democratic deficit' -- 11.5 Political versus cultural community -- 11.6 The global significance of the EU -- 12 International commercial law and private governance -- 12.1 The lex mercatoria -- 12.1.1 Definition -- 12.1.2 History -- 12.1.3 The nature of the 'new' lex mercatoria -- 12.1.4 Codification -- 12.2 European contract law and codification -- 12.2.1 Synthetic aspects -- 12.2.2 Organic aspects -- 12.3 Contract and private governance -- 12.3.1 Arbitration -- 12.3.2 Contractual authority as private government -- 12.4 Private authority and globalist jurisprudence -- 13 Conclusion: what is to be done?
  • 13.1 Lions and dragons: revisiting celestial and terrestrial patterns of authority -- 13.1.1 The original European community -- 13.1.2 The rise of the state -- 13.1.3 The economic particularity of the nation-state -- 13.1.4 The rise of world society -- 13.2 Revisiting the concept of globalisation -- 13.3 Some implications for legal education and practice -- 13.3.1 The contingency of law and justice -- 13.3.2 Speed as virtue -- 13.3.3 Time for generalities -- 13.4 The importance of historical consciousness today -- 13.4.1 Integrative jurisprudence -- 13.4.2 Justifying authority: a romantic lesson -- 13.5 Is there anything new under the sun? -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC412766
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (378 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780511477218
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC412766
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL412766
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10279718
  • (OCoLC)437089922

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