Coverart for item
The Resource Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :

Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :

Label
Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :
Title
Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McKendrick, Ewan
Dewey number
346.42022
LC call number
KD1596 -- .F67 2013eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Lloyd's Commercial Law Library
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Discharge of contracts -- England
  • Impossibility of performance -- England
  • Vis major (Civil law) -- England
Label
Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Foreword -- Preface -- Contributors -- Table of Contents -- Table of Cases -- Table of Legislation -- PART I-FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION: INTRODUCTION AND INTERRELATIONSHIP -- 1. THE JUDICIAL CONSTRUCTION OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What is force majeure? -- (a) Force majeure in French law -- (b) Force majeure in English law -- 3. What is a force majeure clause? -- 4. Are force majeure clauses exclusion clauses? -- (a) Canons of construction -- (b) Burden of proof -- 5. Conclusion -- 2. FORCE MAJEURE IN FRENCH LAW -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Function of force majeure -- 3. Meaning of force majeure -- (a) Irresistibility -- (b) Unforeseeability -- (c) Externality -- (d) Impossibility -- 4. Can a strike constitute force majeure? -- 5. Consequences of force majeure -- 6. Imprévision -- 7. Comparison with English law -- 3. FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION-THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The relationship between force majeure and frustration -- 3. Express provision -- 4. Why draft a force majeure clause? -- 5. Frustration-a modern definition -- (a) The basis of the doctrine of frustration -- (b) Contexts and contortions-an excursus -- (c) A doctrine with "very narrow limits" -- (d) The consequences of frustration -- (e) Self-induced frustration -- (f) Frustration and fault -- 6. Conclusion -- PART II-THE DRAFTING OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES -- 4. DRAFTING OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES-SOME GENERAL GUIDELINES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Definition of the event -- 3. Obligations to report -- 4. The effect of the event -- 5. Questions of adjudication -- 6. Hardship clauses -- 5. THE DETAILED DRAFTING OF A FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSE -- 1. Identifying the objectives -- 2. The requirement for clear words -- (a) The demurrage cases
  • (b) Possible gaps in the ordinary force majeure clause -- 3. Main components of a force majeure clause -- 4. A statement of the force majeure events -- (a) Burden of proof -- (b) "Physical or legal impossibility" -- (c) Negligence -- (d) Defaults other than negligence -- (e) Circumstances already existing at the date of the contract -- (f) Foreseeability -- (g) Anticipating a force majeure event -- 5. Detailed drafting points regarding the events in which the clause is capable of being brought into operation -- (a) The specific events -- Acts of authority -- (i) The relevant jurisdictions -- (ii) International sanctions -- (iii) Licences -- (iv) Prerogative action, invalid action and public sector entities -- (v) Action by a regime not considered a government -- Strikes -- (i) What is a "strike"? -- (ii) The duty to take reasonable steps to settle -- (iii) After-effects -- (iv) Apprehension of a strike -- (b) The general sweeper-up formula -- (c) The ejusdem generis rule -- 6. Effect on a party's ability to perform the contract -- 7. The affected party's duties -- 8. Mechanism for bringing the clause into operation -- (a) Mandatory or directory? -- (b) Contents of force majeure notice -- (c) Methods of serving a force majeure notice -- (d) Time period for service of force majeure notice -- 9. The consequences of the clause applying -- (a) Termination or suspension? -- (b) Effect on liquidated damages -- (c) Allocation of supplies -- 10. Adjustment of the contract -- (a) Obligation to negotiate or obligation to use best endeavours to agree amendments -- (b) Hardship clauses-the Superior case -- (c) Adjustments to contract to be determined by an expert -- 11. Payment adjustments -- (a) Unjust enrichment or adjustment of loss? -- (b) Recovery of money paid -- (c) Recovery for expenses incurred -- (d) Accounting for benefits obtained
  • 12. The mechanism for bringing the operation of the clause to an end -- 13. Excluding the doctrine of frustration -- PART III-FRUSTRATION, FORCE MAJEURE AND SHIPPING LAW -- 6. FRUSTRATION AND SHIPPING LAW-OLD PROBLEMS, NEW CONTEXTS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Frustration and freight -- 3. The Law Reform (Frustrated Contracts) Act 1943 -- 4. Frustration by delay -- 7. FORCE MAJEURE PROVISIONS IN A SHIPBUILDING CONTEXT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The definition of force majeure -- (a) "Acts of God" -- (b) "Strikes, lockouts or other labour disturbances" -- (c) "Labour shortage" -- (d) "Explosions" -- (e) "Shortage of materials, machinery or equipment . . . delays in delivery" -- (f) "Defects in materials, machinery or equipment which could not have been detected by the Builder using reasonable care" -- (g) "Delays in the Builder's other commitments which in turn delay construction of the Vessel" -- (h) "Other causes or accidents beyond the control of the Builder, its subcontractors or suppliers whether or not indicated by the foregoing words" -- 3. The effect of force majeure events -- 4. The requirement of notice -- 5. Excessive delay -- 8. WAR CLAUSES IN TIME CHARTERPARTIES -- 1. The public international law view of "war" -- 2. The construction of time charterparty war cancellation clauses -- 3. When does a war start? -- 4. Is an invasion always a war? -- 5. Is there a touchstone? -- 6. Evidence of war -- 7. When is a state "involved" in a war? -- 8. When must notice of termination be given? -- 9. "Warlike operations" -- PART IV-APPLYING THE PRINCIPLES: INDUSTRIAL ACTION AND BUILDING CONTRACTS -- 9. THE PRIVATE LAW EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ACTION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Exculpatory terms -- 3. When performance is disrupted by external industrial action (that is, by action not among the contractor's own personnel) -- (a) Frustration
  • (b) Limitation or qualification of the obligation -- 4. When performance is disrupted by internal industrial action (that is, by action among the contractor's own personnel) -- (a) Qualified obligation -- (b) Frustration -- 5. Vicarious liability for industrial action -- 6. Discretionary remedies -- 10. FRUSTRATION AND FORCE MAJEURE IN BUILDING CONTRACTS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The textbook view -- 3. Into the age of excuse -- (a) Destruction of the subject matter of the contract -- (b) Delay -- (c) Subsequent legal changes and supervening illegality -- (d) Ground conditions -- (e) Strikes -- (f) Weather -- (g) Inflation, price and cost increases -- 4. The role of foreseeability -- 5. A re-evaluation -- (a) A comparative perspective -- (b) The United States -- (c) English law-time for judicial adjustment of contracts -- 6. Force majeure -- 7. Standard form building contracts-force majeure and frustration -- 8. Conclusion -- PART V-FRUSTRATION, REMEDIES AND RE-APPRAISAL -- 11. THE CONSEQUENCES OF FRUSTRATION-THE LAW REFORM (FRUSTRATED CONTRACTS) ACT 1943 -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The common law prior to the 1943 Act -- 3. The scope of the 1943 Act -- 4. The purpose behind the 1943 Act -- 5. The recovery of money: section 1(2) -- (a) Sums paid or payable "before the time of discharge" -- (b) The proviso -- (c) Does the payee have a cause of action? -- 6. Recovery in respect of non-monetary benefits: section 1(3) -- (a) Identification of the benefit -- (b) Valuing the benefit -- (c) The just sum -- (d) No discharge of obligations prior to date of discharge -- (e) Obligations performed after the date of discharge -- 7. Severability: section 2(4) -- 8. Contrary intention: section 2(3) -- 9. Prior breach by the plaintiff -- 10. Excepted cases -- 11. The future -- 12. FRUSTRATION AND ESTOPPEL
  • PART VI-FRUSTRATION AND FORCE MAJEURE-INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE ASPECTS -- 13. FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION UNDER INTERNATIONAL SALES CONTRACTS -- 1. Frustration -- 2. Sale of goods -- 3. Specific goods -- 4. The goods perish -- 5. Avoidance -- 6. Effect of frustration -- 7. Problems with frustration -- 8. Force majeure -- 9. Unfair terms? -- 10. Vienna Convention -- 11. Conclusion -- 14. EXEMPTIONS AND IMPOSSIBILITY UNDER THE VIENNA CONVENTION -- 1. Exclusion and modification of Article 79 -- 2. Freedom from formalities -- 3. Contracts not within the Convention -- 4. General principles of interpretation -- 5. Usage and custom -- 6. Passing of risk -- 7. Preparatory questions -- 8. Article 79 -- 9. Impediment v. Circumstances -- 10. Impossibility v. Frustration -- 11. Operation of the impediment -- 12. Failure of a third party -- 13. Temporary interruption -- 14. Notice -- 15. Remedies -- (a) Remedies for buyer -- (b) Remedies for seller -- 16. Default in co-operation -- 17. Conclusions -- 15. THE 1973 MISSISSIPPI FLOODS: "FORCE MAJEURE" AND EXPORT PROHIBITION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The events of 1973 -- 3. Force majeure -- 4. Prohibition of export -- 5. Conclusion -- 16. THE APPLICATION OF COMMERCIAL IMPRACTICABILITY UNDER ARTICLE 2-615 OF THE UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The conditions of article 2-615 of the Uniform Commercial Code -- The role and function of article 2-615 -- 3. Article 2-615 and related principles of legal excuse -- Frustration of purpose -- 4. The scope of commercial impracticability -- (a) Commercial impracticability and commercial hardship -- (b) Article 2-615 and increased costs in performance -- (c) What constitutes excessive cost and excessive hardship? -- 5. A comparison between US doctrine of impracticability and the English doctrine of frustration -- A comparative case analysis
  • 6. Article 2-615: the method of performance and failure or unavailability of the source of supply
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1579829
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (404 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317908814
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1579829
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1579829
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10819225
  • (OCoLC)866441979
Label
Force Majeure and Frustration of Contract :
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Foreword -- Preface -- Contributors -- Table of Contents -- Table of Cases -- Table of Legislation -- PART I-FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION: INTRODUCTION AND INTERRELATIONSHIP -- 1. THE JUDICIAL CONSTRUCTION OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What is force majeure? -- (a) Force majeure in French law -- (b) Force majeure in English law -- 3. What is a force majeure clause? -- 4. Are force majeure clauses exclusion clauses? -- (a) Canons of construction -- (b) Burden of proof -- 5. Conclusion -- 2. FORCE MAJEURE IN FRENCH LAW -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Function of force majeure -- 3. Meaning of force majeure -- (a) Irresistibility -- (b) Unforeseeability -- (c) Externality -- (d) Impossibility -- 4. Can a strike constitute force majeure? -- 5. Consequences of force majeure -- 6. Imprévision -- 7. Comparison with English law -- 3. FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION-THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The relationship between force majeure and frustration -- 3. Express provision -- 4. Why draft a force majeure clause? -- 5. Frustration-a modern definition -- (a) The basis of the doctrine of frustration -- (b) Contexts and contortions-an excursus -- (c) A doctrine with "very narrow limits" -- (d) The consequences of frustration -- (e) Self-induced frustration -- (f) Frustration and fault -- 6. Conclusion -- PART II-THE DRAFTING OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES -- 4. DRAFTING OF FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSES-SOME GENERAL GUIDELINES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Definition of the event -- 3. Obligations to report -- 4. The effect of the event -- 5. Questions of adjudication -- 6. Hardship clauses -- 5. THE DETAILED DRAFTING OF A FORCE MAJEURE CLAUSE -- 1. Identifying the objectives -- 2. The requirement for clear words -- (a) The demurrage cases
  • (b) Possible gaps in the ordinary force majeure clause -- 3. Main components of a force majeure clause -- 4. A statement of the force majeure events -- (a) Burden of proof -- (b) "Physical or legal impossibility" -- (c) Negligence -- (d) Defaults other than negligence -- (e) Circumstances already existing at the date of the contract -- (f) Foreseeability -- (g) Anticipating a force majeure event -- 5. Detailed drafting points regarding the events in which the clause is capable of being brought into operation -- (a) The specific events -- Acts of authority -- (i) The relevant jurisdictions -- (ii) International sanctions -- (iii) Licences -- (iv) Prerogative action, invalid action and public sector entities -- (v) Action by a regime not considered a government -- Strikes -- (i) What is a "strike"? -- (ii) The duty to take reasonable steps to settle -- (iii) After-effects -- (iv) Apprehension of a strike -- (b) The general sweeper-up formula -- (c) The ejusdem generis rule -- 6. Effect on a party's ability to perform the contract -- 7. The affected party's duties -- 8. Mechanism for bringing the clause into operation -- (a) Mandatory or directory? -- (b) Contents of force majeure notice -- (c) Methods of serving a force majeure notice -- (d) Time period for service of force majeure notice -- 9. The consequences of the clause applying -- (a) Termination or suspension? -- (b) Effect on liquidated damages -- (c) Allocation of supplies -- 10. Adjustment of the contract -- (a) Obligation to negotiate or obligation to use best endeavours to agree amendments -- (b) Hardship clauses-the Superior case -- (c) Adjustments to contract to be determined by an expert -- 11. Payment adjustments -- (a) Unjust enrichment or adjustment of loss? -- (b) Recovery of money paid -- (c) Recovery for expenses incurred -- (d) Accounting for benefits obtained
  • 12. The mechanism for bringing the operation of the clause to an end -- 13. Excluding the doctrine of frustration -- PART III-FRUSTRATION, FORCE MAJEURE AND SHIPPING LAW -- 6. FRUSTRATION AND SHIPPING LAW-OLD PROBLEMS, NEW CONTEXTS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Frustration and freight -- 3. The Law Reform (Frustrated Contracts) Act 1943 -- 4. Frustration by delay -- 7. FORCE MAJEURE PROVISIONS IN A SHIPBUILDING CONTEXT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The definition of force majeure -- (a) "Acts of God" -- (b) "Strikes, lockouts or other labour disturbances" -- (c) "Labour shortage" -- (d) "Explosions" -- (e) "Shortage of materials, machinery or equipment . . . delays in delivery" -- (f) "Defects in materials, machinery or equipment which could not have been detected by the Builder using reasonable care" -- (g) "Delays in the Builder's other commitments which in turn delay construction of the Vessel" -- (h) "Other causes or accidents beyond the control of the Builder, its subcontractors or suppliers whether or not indicated by the foregoing words" -- 3. The effect of force majeure events -- 4. The requirement of notice -- 5. Excessive delay -- 8. WAR CLAUSES IN TIME CHARTERPARTIES -- 1. The public international law view of "war" -- 2. The construction of time charterparty war cancellation clauses -- 3. When does a war start? -- 4. Is an invasion always a war? -- 5. Is there a touchstone? -- 6. Evidence of war -- 7. When is a state "involved" in a war? -- 8. When must notice of termination be given? -- 9. "Warlike operations" -- PART IV-APPLYING THE PRINCIPLES: INDUSTRIAL ACTION AND BUILDING CONTRACTS -- 9. THE PRIVATE LAW EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ACTION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Exculpatory terms -- 3. When performance is disrupted by external industrial action (that is, by action not among the contractor's own personnel) -- (a) Frustration
  • (b) Limitation or qualification of the obligation -- 4. When performance is disrupted by internal industrial action (that is, by action among the contractor's own personnel) -- (a) Qualified obligation -- (b) Frustration -- 5. Vicarious liability for industrial action -- 6. Discretionary remedies -- 10. FRUSTRATION AND FORCE MAJEURE IN BUILDING CONTRACTS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The textbook view -- 3. Into the age of excuse -- (a) Destruction of the subject matter of the contract -- (b) Delay -- (c) Subsequent legal changes and supervening illegality -- (d) Ground conditions -- (e) Strikes -- (f) Weather -- (g) Inflation, price and cost increases -- 4. The role of foreseeability -- 5. A re-evaluation -- (a) A comparative perspective -- (b) The United States -- (c) English law-time for judicial adjustment of contracts -- 6. Force majeure -- 7. Standard form building contracts-force majeure and frustration -- 8. Conclusion -- PART V-FRUSTRATION, REMEDIES AND RE-APPRAISAL -- 11. THE CONSEQUENCES OF FRUSTRATION-THE LAW REFORM (FRUSTRATED CONTRACTS) ACT 1943 -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The common law prior to the 1943 Act -- 3. The scope of the 1943 Act -- 4. The purpose behind the 1943 Act -- 5. The recovery of money: section 1(2) -- (a) Sums paid or payable "before the time of discharge" -- (b) The proviso -- (c) Does the payee have a cause of action? -- 6. Recovery in respect of non-monetary benefits: section 1(3) -- (a) Identification of the benefit -- (b) Valuing the benefit -- (c) The just sum -- (d) No discharge of obligations prior to date of discharge -- (e) Obligations performed after the date of discharge -- 7. Severability: section 2(4) -- 8. Contrary intention: section 2(3) -- 9. Prior breach by the plaintiff -- 10. Excepted cases -- 11. The future -- 12. FRUSTRATION AND ESTOPPEL
  • PART VI-FRUSTRATION AND FORCE MAJEURE-INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE ASPECTS -- 13. FORCE MAJEURE AND FRUSTRATION UNDER INTERNATIONAL SALES CONTRACTS -- 1. Frustration -- 2. Sale of goods -- 3. Specific goods -- 4. The goods perish -- 5. Avoidance -- 6. Effect of frustration -- 7. Problems with frustration -- 8. Force majeure -- 9. Unfair terms? -- 10. Vienna Convention -- 11. Conclusion -- 14. EXEMPTIONS AND IMPOSSIBILITY UNDER THE VIENNA CONVENTION -- 1. Exclusion and modification of Article 79 -- 2. Freedom from formalities -- 3. Contracts not within the Convention -- 4. General principles of interpretation -- 5. Usage and custom -- 6. Passing of risk -- 7. Preparatory questions -- 8. Article 79 -- 9. Impediment v. Circumstances -- 10. Impossibility v. Frustration -- 11. Operation of the impediment -- 12. Failure of a third party -- 13. Temporary interruption -- 14. Notice -- 15. Remedies -- (a) Remedies for buyer -- (b) Remedies for seller -- 16. Default in co-operation -- 17. Conclusions -- 15. THE 1973 MISSISSIPPI FLOODS: "FORCE MAJEURE" AND EXPORT PROHIBITION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The events of 1973 -- 3. Force majeure -- 4. Prohibition of export -- 5. Conclusion -- 16. THE APPLICATION OF COMMERCIAL IMPRACTICABILITY UNDER ARTICLE 2-615 OF THE UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The conditions of article 2-615 of the Uniform Commercial Code -- The role and function of article 2-615 -- 3. Article 2-615 and related principles of legal excuse -- Frustration of purpose -- 4. The scope of commercial impracticability -- (a) Commercial impracticability and commercial hardship -- (b) Article 2-615 and increased costs in performance -- (c) What constitutes excessive cost and excessive hardship? -- 5. A comparison between US doctrine of impracticability and the English doctrine of frustration -- A comparative case analysis
  • 6. Article 2-615: the method of performance and failure or unavailability of the source of supply
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1579829
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (404 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317908814
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1579829
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1579829
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10819225
  • (OCoLC)866441979

Library Locations

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      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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