Coverart for item
The Resource Expanding Peace Ecology : Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission

Expanding Peace Ecology : Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission

Label
Expanding Peace Ecology : Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission
Title
Expanding Peace Ecology
Title remainder
Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Spring, Ursula Oswald
Dewey number
304.2
LC call number
K3581-3598.22GE170HC
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Brauch, Hans Günter
  • Tidball, Keith
Series statement
SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace Ser.
Series volume
v.12
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Environmental law
  • Environmental sciences
  • Social service
  • Sustainable development
Label
Expanding Peace Ecology : Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contents -- 1 Expanding Peace Ecology: Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity, and Gender -- Abstract -- 1.1{u0083}Introduction -- 1.2{u0083}Conceptualization of Peace and Ecology -- 1.2.1 Peace -- 1.2.2 Ecology -- 1.3{u0083}Expanding Conceptualization of Peace Since the 1980s and Widening of the Ecology Concept -- 1.3.1 Expanding Peace Towards Environment Issues -- 1.3.2 Widening of the Security Concept Towards the Environment and Ecology -- 1.3.3 Widening Ecology -- 1.4{u0083}Linkages Between Peace and Ecology -- 1.5{u0083}Evolution of Peace Ecology -- 1.5.1 Introducing Peace Ecology -- 1.5.2 Reconceptualizing Peace Ecology -- 1.5.3 Linking Political Geoecology and Peace Ecology -- 1.5.4 Five Conceptual Pillars of Peace Ecology -- 1.6{u0083}Expanding Peace Ecology -- 1.7{u0083}On the Chapters in this Book -- References -- Part IExploring Peace Ecology -- 2 From Climate Change and Security Impacts to Sustainability Transition: Two Policy Debates and Scientific Discourses -- Abstract -- 2.1{u2026}Introduction: Two Alternative Discourses -- 2.2{u2026}Assessment of GHG Emissions since 1990 and Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol: A Climate Paradox -- 2.3{u2026}First Discourse: Securitization of Climate Change -- 2.3.1 Climate Change and International Security: EU and UN -- 2.3.2 Climate Change and National Security -- 2.3.3 Climate Change and Human Security -- 2.4{u2026}Climate Change and Security in the Social Sciences -- 2.5{u2026}Alternative Discourse: Proactive Policies Towards a Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace -- 2.6{u2026}Emergence of the Alternative Discourse -- 2.7{u2026}Goal of the STSP Project -- 2.8{u2026}Conclusions -- References -- 3 Peace Research and Greening in the Red Zone: Community-Based Ecological Restoration to Enhance Resilience and Transitions Toward Peace -- Abstract -- 3.1{u2026}Introduction: The Birth of Environmental Security -- 3.2{u2026}From Environmental Security to Environmental Peacemaking
  • 3.3{u2026}Greening in the Red Zone -- 3.3.1 Greening -- 3.3.2 Red Zones -- 3.4{u2026}Mechanisms of Resilience and Other 'Re-Words': Community-Based Ecological Restoration -- 3.5{u2026}Urgent Biophilia -- 3.6{u2026}Restorative Topophilia -- 3.7{u2026}Memorialization Mechanisms -- 3.8{u2026}Social-Ecological Symbols and Social-Ecological Rituals -- 3.9{u2026}Discourses of Defiance -- 3.10{u2026}Conclusion -- References -- 4 Social and Environmental Vulnerability in a River Basin of Mexico -- Abstract -- 4.1{u2026}Introduction -- 4.2{u2026}Environmental and Social Vulnerability: A Double Vulnerability -- 4.3{u2026}Research Area and Methodology -- 4.3.1 Research Area -- 4.3.2 Research Methodology -- 4.4{u2026}Double Vulnerability in the Yautepec River Basin: Disasters, Threats, Marginalization and Poverty -- 4.4.1 Environmental Vulnerability -- 4.4.2 Social Vulnerability -- 4.4.3 Interaction Between Environmental and Social Vulnerability -- 4.5{u2026}Coping Strategies: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Linkages with a Gender Perspective -- 4.6{u2026}Conclusions: Adaptation for an Alternative Livelihood from the Bottom Up -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part IIExploring Peace Ecology: Peace and Environmental Education, Mobile Learning and Rebuilding Community -- 5 Mobile Learning, Rebuilding Community Through Building Communities, Supporting Community Capacities: Post-Natural Disaster Experiences -- Abstract -- 5.1{u0083}Introduction -- 5.2{u0083}Disaster Sociology -- 5.3{u0083}Risk Communication -- 5.3.1 Risk and Perception of Risk -- 5.3.2 Risk Communication -- 5.3.3 Fear and Anxiety from the Unknown -- 5.4{u0083}Online Resources -- 5.4.1 Types of Online Resources -- 5.4.1.1 Online Communities -- 5.4.1.2 Social Media -- 5.4.1.3 Micro-Blogging -- 5.4.2 Roles of Online Resources -- 5.4.2.1 Information Seeking -- 5.4.2.2 Social and Action Support -- 5.4.3 Online Resources Currently Available -- 5.5{u0083}Empowering and Educating Individuals and Social Groups in Disaster
  • 5.5.1 Empowering and Educating Through Online Communities -- 5.5.2 Rebuilding Communities Through Building Online Communities -- 5.6{u0083}Conclusion -- Other Literature -- 6 Beyond the Surface: The Deeper Challenge in Environmental Education---Transforming Consciousness Through Peace Environmental Education -- Abstract -- 6.1{u2026}Introduction -- 6.2{u2026}Environmental Education in the United States -- 6.3{u2026}Conceptual Framework -- 6.3.1 Historical Context of Peace Education Linked to Environmental Ecology in the 1990s -- 6.3.2 Peace Consciousness -- 6.3.3 Emergent Biophilia: The Biophilia Hypothesis and Intentionality -- 6.3.4 Methodological Framework -- 6.4{u2026}The Peace Environmental Education Course -- 6.4.1 Education for All and Everywhere -- 6.4.2 Transdisciplinarity -- 6.4.3 Building Trust, Empathy, Respect and Understanding Among Differences and Cultures -- 6.4.4 Student Generated Projects -- 6.5{u2026}Methodology -- 6.5.1 Subjects -- 6.5.2 Questionnaire -- 6.6{u2026}Findings -- 6.6.1 Instrumental/Pragmatic Transformation -- 6.6.2 Communicative/Substantive Transformation -- 6.6.3 Perspective/Critical Transformation -- 6.6.4 Summary Analysis -- 6.7{u2026}Conclusions and Further Research -- References -- 7 Building Peace by Rebuilding Community Through Women in Japan -- Abstract -- 7.1{u0083}Introduction -- 7.2{u0083}Present Situation of Japanese Women -- 7.3{u0083}Efforts to Change Reality by Women at a Grassroots Level -- 7.3.1 The Japan Federation of Women's Organizations -- 7.3.2 The New Japan Women's Association -- 7.3.3 Mothers' Movement for Peace -- 7.3.4 A Successful Case of Women's Movement Against Constructing Nuclear Power Plants in Kochi -- 7.4{u0083}Conclusion -- References -- Part IIIAbility Expectations and Satoyama Sustainability and Peace -- 8 'Culture of Peace' from an Ability and Disability Studies Lens -- Abstract -- 8.1{u2026}Introduction -- 8.2{u2026}Setting the Stage
  • 8.2.1 The UN Report on a New Global Partnership (2013) -- 8.2.2 Human Security -- 8.2.3 Lenses of Ability and Disability Studies -- 8.2.4 Ability Expectation and Ableism -- 8.3{u2026}'Culture of Peace' Through a Disability Studies Lens -- 8.4{u2026}Culture of Peace Through an Ability Studies Lens -- 8.4.1 Human--Human Relationship -- 8.4.2 Culture of Peace and Eco-Ableism: Human--Nature and Human--Animal Relationships -- 8.5{u2026}Conclusion -- References -- 9 Converting the Forces of Nature into a Cultural Force: An Invitation to Pursue the Study of Satoyamas -- Abstract -- 9.1{u2026}Three Values (3 'Yu') Arising from Satoyama Studies: 'Yume' (Dreams), 'Yutori' (Leaving Space), and 'Yuki' (Courage) -- 9.1.1 Dreams: A Dream of Participating in Satoyama Study as an Exercise in Local Research -- 9.1.2 Leaving Space: Applying the Old Calendar as a Path to Leaving Space in Life for Taking a Breath and Enjoying True Affluence -- 9.1.3 Courage: The Satoyama as a Place for Preparing for Death: Discovering Tree Burials -- 9.2{u2026}The Three Crises that Threaten Human Beings and How They Intersect with Satoyama Studies -- 9.3{u2026}Satoyama Study is Another Way of Linking the Past with the Future -- References -- Additional Information in English is at: -- About the Contributors -- About the Editors -- About this Book
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1592508
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (213 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319007298
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1592508
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1592508
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10815145
  • (OCoLC)871776288
Label
Expanding Peace Ecology : Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity and Gender: Perspectives of Ipra's Ecology and Peace Commission
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contents -- 1 Expanding Peace Ecology: Peace, Security, Sustainability, Equity, and Gender -- Abstract -- 1.1{u0083}Introduction -- 1.2{u0083}Conceptualization of Peace and Ecology -- 1.2.1 Peace -- 1.2.2 Ecology -- 1.3{u0083}Expanding Conceptualization of Peace Since the 1980s and Widening of the Ecology Concept -- 1.3.1 Expanding Peace Towards Environment Issues -- 1.3.2 Widening of the Security Concept Towards the Environment and Ecology -- 1.3.3 Widening Ecology -- 1.4{u0083}Linkages Between Peace and Ecology -- 1.5{u0083}Evolution of Peace Ecology -- 1.5.1 Introducing Peace Ecology -- 1.5.2 Reconceptualizing Peace Ecology -- 1.5.3 Linking Political Geoecology and Peace Ecology -- 1.5.4 Five Conceptual Pillars of Peace Ecology -- 1.6{u0083}Expanding Peace Ecology -- 1.7{u0083}On the Chapters in this Book -- References -- Part IExploring Peace Ecology -- 2 From Climate Change and Security Impacts to Sustainability Transition: Two Policy Debates and Scientific Discourses -- Abstract -- 2.1{u2026}Introduction: Two Alternative Discourses -- 2.2{u2026}Assessment of GHG Emissions since 1990 and Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol: A Climate Paradox -- 2.3{u2026}First Discourse: Securitization of Climate Change -- 2.3.1 Climate Change and International Security: EU and UN -- 2.3.2 Climate Change and National Security -- 2.3.3 Climate Change and Human Security -- 2.4{u2026}Climate Change and Security in the Social Sciences -- 2.5{u2026}Alternative Discourse: Proactive Policies Towards a Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace -- 2.6{u2026}Emergence of the Alternative Discourse -- 2.7{u2026}Goal of the STSP Project -- 2.8{u2026}Conclusions -- References -- 3 Peace Research and Greening in the Red Zone: Community-Based Ecological Restoration to Enhance Resilience and Transitions Toward Peace -- Abstract -- 3.1{u2026}Introduction: The Birth of Environmental Security -- 3.2{u2026}From Environmental Security to Environmental Peacemaking
  • 3.3{u2026}Greening in the Red Zone -- 3.3.1 Greening -- 3.3.2 Red Zones -- 3.4{u2026}Mechanisms of Resilience and Other 'Re-Words': Community-Based Ecological Restoration -- 3.5{u2026}Urgent Biophilia -- 3.6{u2026}Restorative Topophilia -- 3.7{u2026}Memorialization Mechanisms -- 3.8{u2026}Social-Ecological Symbols and Social-Ecological Rituals -- 3.9{u2026}Discourses of Defiance -- 3.10{u2026}Conclusion -- References -- 4 Social and Environmental Vulnerability in a River Basin of Mexico -- Abstract -- 4.1{u2026}Introduction -- 4.2{u2026}Environmental and Social Vulnerability: A Double Vulnerability -- 4.3{u2026}Research Area and Methodology -- 4.3.1 Research Area -- 4.3.2 Research Methodology -- 4.4{u2026}Double Vulnerability in the Yautepec River Basin: Disasters, Threats, Marginalization and Poverty -- 4.4.1 Environmental Vulnerability -- 4.4.2 Social Vulnerability -- 4.4.3 Interaction Between Environmental and Social Vulnerability -- 4.5{u2026}Coping Strategies: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Linkages with a Gender Perspective -- 4.6{u2026}Conclusions: Adaptation for an Alternative Livelihood from the Bottom Up -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part IIExploring Peace Ecology: Peace and Environmental Education, Mobile Learning and Rebuilding Community -- 5 Mobile Learning, Rebuilding Community Through Building Communities, Supporting Community Capacities: Post-Natural Disaster Experiences -- Abstract -- 5.1{u0083}Introduction -- 5.2{u0083}Disaster Sociology -- 5.3{u0083}Risk Communication -- 5.3.1 Risk and Perception of Risk -- 5.3.2 Risk Communication -- 5.3.3 Fear and Anxiety from the Unknown -- 5.4{u0083}Online Resources -- 5.4.1 Types of Online Resources -- 5.4.1.1 Online Communities -- 5.4.1.2 Social Media -- 5.4.1.3 Micro-Blogging -- 5.4.2 Roles of Online Resources -- 5.4.2.1 Information Seeking -- 5.4.2.2 Social and Action Support -- 5.4.3 Online Resources Currently Available -- 5.5{u0083}Empowering and Educating Individuals and Social Groups in Disaster
  • 5.5.1 Empowering and Educating Through Online Communities -- 5.5.2 Rebuilding Communities Through Building Online Communities -- 5.6{u0083}Conclusion -- Other Literature -- 6 Beyond the Surface: The Deeper Challenge in Environmental Education---Transforming Consciousness Through Peace Environmental Education -- Abstract -- 6.1{u2026}Introduction -- 6.2{u2026}Environmental Education in the United States -- 6.3{u2026}Conceptual Framework -- 6.3.1 Historical Context of Peace Education Linked to Environmental Ecology in the 1990s -- 6.3.2 Peace Consciousness -- 6.3.3 Emergent Biophilia: The Biophilia Hypothesis and Intentionality -- 6.3.4 Methodological Framework -- 6.4{u2026}The Peace Environmental Education Course -- 6.4.1 Education for All and Everywhere -- 6.4.2 Transdisciplinarity -- 6.4.3 Building Trust, Empathy, Respect and Understanding Among Differences and Cultures -- 6.4.4 Student Generated Projects -- 6.5{u2026}Methodology -- 6.5.1 Subjects -- 6.5.2 Questionnaire -- 6.6{u2026}Findings -- 6.6.1 Instrumental/Pragmatic Transformation -- 6.6.2 Communicative/Substantive Transformation -- 6.6.3 Perspective/Critical Transformation -- 6.6.4 Summary Analysis -- 6.7{u2026}Conclusions and Further Research -- References -- 7 Building Peace by Rebuilding Community Through Women in Japan -- Abstract -- 7.1{u0083}Introduction -- 7.2{u0083}Present Situation of Japanese Women -- 7.3{u0083}Efforts to Change Reality by Women at a Grassroots Level -- 7.3.1 The Japan Federation of Women's Organizations -- 7.3.2 The New Japan Women's Association -- 7.3.3 Mothers' Movement for Peace -- 7.3.4 A Successful Case of Women's Movement Against Constructing Nuclear Power Plants in Kochi -- 7.4{u0083}Conclusion -- References -- Part IIIAbility Expectations and Satoyama Sustainability and Peace -- 8 'Culture of Peace' from an Ability and Disability Studies Lens -- Abstract -- 8.1{u2026}Introduction -- 8.2{u2026}Setting the Stage
  • 8.2.1 The UN Report on a New Global Partnership (2013) -- 8.2.2 Human Security -- 8.2.3 Lenses of Ability and Disability Studies -- 8.2.4 Ability Expectation and Ableism -- 8.3{u2026}'Culture of Peace' Through a Disability Studies Lens -- 8.4{u2026}Culture of Peace Through an Ability Studies Lens -- 8.4.1 Human--Human Relationship -- 8.4.2 Culture of Peace and Eco-Ableism: Human--Nature and Human--Animal Relationships -- 8.5{u2026}Conclusion -- References -- 9 Converting the Forces of Nature into a Cultural Force: An Invitation to Pursue the Study of Satoyamas -- Abstract -- 9.1{u2026}Three Values (3 'Yu') Arising from Satoyama Studies: 'Yume' (Dreams), 'Yutori' (Leaving Space), and 'Yuki' (Courage) -- 9.1.1 Dreams: A Dream of Participating in Satoyama Study as an Exercise in Local Research -- 9.1.2 Leaving Space: Applying the Old Calendar as a Path to Leaving Space in Life for Taking a Breath and Enjoying True Affluence -- 9.1.3 Courage: The Satoyama as a Place for Preparing for Death: Discovering Tree Burials -- 9.2{u2026}The Three Crises that Threaten Human Beings and How They Intersect with Satoyama Studies -- 9.3{u2026}Satoyama Study is Another Way of Linking the Past with the Future -- References -- Additional Information in English is at: -- About the Contributors -- About the Editors -- About this Book
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC1592508
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (213 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319007298
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1592508
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1592508
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10815145
  • (OCoLC)871776288

Library Locations

    • Leon E. Bloch Law LibraryBorrow it
      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
Processing Feedback ...