Coverart for item
The Resource Executive compensation : accounting and economic issues, Gary Giroux, (electronic resource)

Executive compensation : accounting and economic issues, Gary Giroux, (electronic resource)

Label
Executive compensation : accounting and economic issues
Title
Executive compensation
Title remainder
accounting and economic issues
Statement of responsibility
Gary Giroux
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • Annotation
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and his or her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued operating and financial success. The CEO and executive team are almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based, but leading to charges that executives have incentives to manipulate corporate earnings and stock price in the short-term for their own self interests. The compensation at some companies became so egregious (Enron and other tech-bubble failures or Citigroup and other banks during the subprime meltdown) that compensation again became a major public policy issue subject to federal regulation. (Popular outrage and calls for government action against well-paid CEOs has been common at least since the 1930s.)
  • Annotation:
Member of
Cataloging source
CaBNVSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Giroux, Gary A
Dewey number
658.4072
LC call number
HD4965.2
LC item number
.G574 2015
Series statement
Financial accounting and auditing collection,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Executives
Summary expansion
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued financial success. This team is almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based; but this structure leads to charges that it provides executives with incentives to manipulate short term corporate earnings and stock prices to serve their own compensation self interests. The book explores this premise and provides guidance into how such determinations are made. Three key points are emphasized in this book. First is the role that accounting and disclosure play in informing the process of determining executive compensation. Second is the recognition that executive compensation can affect corporate behavior in a variety of ways; and finally, there is the acknowledgement that executive compensation cannot be fully understood without one first becoming familiar with economic theory and empirical research related to compensation models. Because the rationale for executive compensation and the way it is viewed has changed over time, this book adopts a historical/chronological perspective. This perspective allows the book to make several observations about the state of executive compensation and how public disclosures about it have been demanded and have increased over time. The business culture and institutional framework for compensation of top executives has changed dramatically since the 1930s, with important ramifications. Types and amounts of executive pay have bounced up and down based on tax laws, regulatory changes and executive self-interest, as executives find new ways to be paid more. Yet research has shown that, despite some notable excesses, overall executive compensation is often more reasonable than recent perceptions would suggest
  • The chief executive officer (CEO) of a corporation and her executive team are responsible for the management of the business and its continued financial success. This team is almost always highly compensated and the relative total compensation has mushroomed over time. Most of the compensation now is designed to be performance-based; but this structure leads to charges that it provides executives with incentives to manipulate short term corporate earnings and stock prices to serve their own compensation self interests. The book explores this premise and provides guidance into how such determinations are made. Three key points are emphasized in this book. First is the role that accounting and disclosure play in informing the process of determining executive compensation. Second is the recognition that executive compensation can affect corporate behavior in a variety of ways; and finally, there is the acknowledgement that executive compensation cannot be fully understood without one first becoming familiar with economic theory and empirical research related to compensation models. Because the rationale for executive compensation and the way it is viewed has changed over time, this book adopts a historical/chronological perspective. This perspective allows the book to make several observations about the state of executive compensation and how public disclosures about it have been demanded and have increased over time. The business culture and institutional framework for compensation of top executives has changed dramatically since the 1930s, with important ramifications. Types and amounts of executive pay have bounced up and down based on tax laws, regulatory changes and executive self-interest, as executives find new ways to be paid more. Yet research has shown that, despite some notable excesses, overall executive compensation is often more reasonable than recent perceptions would suggest
Label
Executive compensation : accounting and economic issues, Gary Giroux, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Part of: 2014 digital library
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-190) and index
Contents
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001536791
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition.
Isbn
9781606498798
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001536791
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader
Label
Executive compensation : accounting and economic issues, Gary Giroux, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Part of: 2014 digital library
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-190) and index
Contents
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
  • Introduction to executive compensation -- Compensation basics -- Accounting for executive pay -- Historical perspective on executive pay -- Economic theory -- International comparisons -- The future of executive compensation -- Appendix 1. Microsoft proxy disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 2. Microsoft 10-K stock compensation disclosures, 2013 -- Appendix 3. Pfizer 10-K disclosures, 2012 -- Timeline -- Glossary -- Notes -- References -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001536791
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition.
Isbn
9781606498798
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001536791
System details
  • Mode of access: World Wide Web
  • System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader

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