Coverart for item
The Resource Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :

Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :

Label
Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :
Title
Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mathis, Klaus
Dewey number
340
LC call number
K-KZ
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Law and Philosophy Library
Series volume
v.98
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Environmental ethics
  • Environmental law
  • Law and economics
  • Sustainable development -- Law and legislation
  • Sustainable development
Label
Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Introduction -- Contents -- Contributors -- About the Authors -- Part I Law and Economics -- Consequentialism in Law -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Consequentialism in the Regulatory Process -- 3 Consequentialism in the Application of Law -- 3.1 Arguments Against Considering Impacts -- 3.2 Arguments in Favour of Considering Impacts -- 3.3 Implications for Legal Practice -- 4 The Example of the Hand rule (learned Hand formula) -- 4.1 The Consequences Paradox -- 4.2 The Bilateralism Critique -- 4.3 Approaches in Swiss Liability Law -- Bibliography -- Consequence-Based Arguments in Legal Reasoning: A Jurisprudential Preface to Law and Economics -- 1 The Jurisprudential Preface -- 2 Legal Reasoning and the Consequences of Judicial Decisions -- 3 What Are Consequence-Based Arguments -- 4 What Type of Consequences Matter -- 5 (When and Why) Should Judges Use Consequence-Based Arguments -- 6 Conceivability and Objections from the Nature of Adjudication -- 7 Feasibility: Objections from Individual and Collective Expertise -- 8 The Alternatives of Judicial Optimization: Ex ante Evaluation and Policy-Making in Legislation and Administration -- 9 Desirability and Legitimacy -- 10 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Is the Rationality of Judicial Judgements Jeopardized by Cognitive biases and Empathy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cognitive Biases -- 2.1 Heuristics and Biases -- 2.1.1 Availability Bias -- 2.1.2 Hindsight Bias -- 2.1.3 Anchoring -- 2.1.4 Confirmation Bias -- 2.1.5 Egocentric Bias -- 2.2 Debiasing -- 3 Empathy -- 4 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part II Law and Sustainability -- Our Responsibility Towards Future Generations -- 1 Introduction -- 2 An Ethics of Responsibility for the Future Generation: The Paradigm of Hans Jonas -- 3 Survival as the Objective of Law: A New Interpretation of Herbert Hart's "Minimum Content of Natural Law"
  • 4 Future of the Species and the Avenue of Transcendence: Tentative Outlines -- Bibliography -- Future Generations in John Rawls, Theory of Justice -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Problem of the Lack of Reciprocity -- 1.2 The ''Just Saving'' Principle -- 2 Justice Between Generations -- 2.1 The Definition of the Original Position -- 2.2 The Supplementary Motivational Assumption -- 2.3 Rawls, Later Proposed Solution -- 2.4 Hume's, Conditions of Justice Versus Kant 's, Universalization -- 2.5 Extending the Veil of Ignorance to Membership of a Generation -- 3 What Should Actually Be Saved -- 3.1 Weak sustainability -- 3.2 Strong Sustainability -- 4 Implications -- Bibliography -- What Is It Like to Be Unborn? -- 1 Our Common Future: Biodiversity and Biotechnology -- 1.1 Interdependencies -- 1.2 Conflicts -- 1.3 Valuing Biodiversity: A Matter of Justice -- 1.4 Future justice (1): The Intrinsic Value of Natural and Cultural Resources -- 2 Custodians of Biological and Cultural Diversity -- 2.1 Rights of Native People and Farmers Rights -- 2.2 Future justice(2): Rights of Biosocial Communities of Fate -- 3 Representatives of the Unforeseeable Future -- 3.1 Junctions and Disjunctions of Law -- 3.2 Future Justice (3): Protecting Future Generations -- 4 Future Generations as Community of Fate -- 4.1 Morally Unborn and Potential Life -- 4.2 Collective ''Quasi-Personal'' Actors -- 4.3 Variables for Contingent Associations -- 4.4 Useful Fiction for Future Justice -- 5 Consequences for the Future of Law -- 5.1 Biodiversity as an Issue of Future Law -- 5.2 Rights of Biodiversity -- 5.3 Rights of Future Justice -- Bibliography -- Cultural Heritage Preservation and Socio-Environmental Sustainability: Sustainable Development, Human Rights and Citizenship -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Age of Rights and Development
  • 2.1 The Discovery of Underdevelopment and Cultural Homologation -- 2.2 Development -- 2.3 An Integrated Approach to Human Rights and Sustainable Development -- 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage -- 3.1 Cultural Heritage, Social Inclusion and Environment -- 3.2 The Common Heritage of Humanity: The Key to Sustainable Development -- 4 A Problem of Effectiveness or Efficiency -- 5 Human Rights, Sustainable Development and Citizenship -- 6 Final Remarks -- Bibliography -- Part III Law, Economics and Sustainability -- Discounting the Future? -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cost-Benefit Analysis -- 3 Reasons for Discounting -- 3.1 Uncertainty About the Future -- 3.2 Increasing Prosperity -- 3.3 Pure Time Preference -- 3.4 Social Opportunity Costs -- 4 Dispersing the Fog -- 4.1 What Is Discounted? -- 4.2 Opportunity Cost Versus Social Discount Rate -- 4.3 The Real Problem -- 4.4 A Two-Stage Decision-Making Procedure -- 5 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- A Critical Review of È̀fficiency Ethics'' The Case of Climate Economics -- 1 Introduction and Problem Specification -- 2 Realistic Climate Data, Economic Damages and Uncertainties -- 3 The Limits to Growth -- 4 Climate Protection and Justice: Why Natural Science and Preference-Based Decision Theory Cannot Lay Sole Claim to Be Labelled "Objective" - and What "Ethics Within IPCC-Reports" Would Mean -- 4.1 The Core of Sustainable Ethics -- 4.2 A Key Distinction: Anthropology (Homo Economicus) Versus Normative Preference Theory Preference theory/Efficiency Theory -- 4.3 Why the Economic Efficiency Theory (Normative Preference Theory) Is Ethics Itself -- Also on the Concepts of Objectivity and Rationality -- 4.4 Why the Normative Preference Theory Is Not Convincing -- 4.5 The Case for a Theory of Justice Based on Discourse Rationality as a Better Alternative to the Preference Theory
  • 5 The Balancing Processes Efficiency Through Quantifications and Discounting -- 6 Governance: Can M̀̀ore Business Ethics and CSR'' Be Effective Climate Protection Climate protection Instruments? On the Misleading Separation of B̀̀ottom Up'' and T̀̀op Down'' Approaches -- Bibliography -- Valuing the Invaluable Valuation of Human Life in Cost-Efficiency Assessments of Regulatory Interventions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Economic Methods for the Valuation of Human Life -- 2.1 Human-Capital Method -- 2.1.1 Method for Quantifying the Value of Destroyed Human Capital -- 2.1.2 Critical Appraisal of the Human-Capital Method -- 2.2 Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.2.1 Starting Point and Aim of the Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.2.2 Methodology for Determining Willingness to Pay -- 2.2.3 Critical Appraisal of the Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.3 Interim Conclusion -- 3 The Moral and Legal Point of View -- 3.1 Permissibility of the Quantitative Valuation of Human Life -- 3.1.1 The Ideal of the Infinite Value of Human Life -- 3.1.2 The Reality of Value and Resource Scarcity-- Or the Normative Force of Actuality -- 3.1.3 Distinction Between Monetary and Normative Value -- 3.2 Permissibility of the Qualitative Valuation of Human Life -- 3.2.1 Differentiation by Age -- 3.2.2 Differentiation by Income -- 3.3 Interim Conclusion -- 4 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC798895
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (249 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789400718692
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC798895
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL798895
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10494479
  • (OCoLC)771213979
Label
Efficiency, Sustainability, and Justice to Future Generations :
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Introduction -- Contents -- Contributors -- About the Authors -- Part I Law and Economics -- Consequentialism in Law -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Consequentialism in the Regulatory Process -- 3 Consequentialism in the Application of Law -- 3.1 Arguments Against Considering Impacts -- 3.2 Arguments in Favour of Considering Impacts -- 3.3 Implications for Legal Practice -- 4 The Example of the Hand rule (learned Hand formula) -- 4.1 The Consequences Paradox -- 4.2 The Bilateralism Critique -- 4.3 Approaches in Swiss Liability Law -- Bibliography -- Consequence-Based Arguments in Legal Reasoning: A Jurisprudential Preface to Law and Economics -- 1 The Jurisprudential Preface -- 2 Legal Reasoning and the Consequences of Judicial Decisions -- 3 What Are Consequence-Based Arguments -- 4 What Type of Consequences Matter -- 5 (When and Why) Should Judges Use Consequence-Based Arguments -- 6 Conceivability and Objections from the Nature of Adjudication -- 7 Feasibility: Objections from Individual and Collective Expertise -- 8 The Alternatives of Judicial Optimization: Ex ante Evaluation and Policy-Making in Legislation and Administration -- 9 Desirability and Legitimacy -- 10 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Is the Rationality of Judicial Judgements Jeopardized by Cognitive biases and Empathy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cognitive Biases -- 2.1 Heuristics and Biases -- 2.1.1 Availability Bias -- 2.1.2 Hindsight Bias -- 2.1.3 Anchoring -- 2.1.4 Confirmation Bias -- 2.1.5 Egocentric Bias -- 2.2 Debiasing -- 3 Empathy -- 4 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part II Law and Sustainability -- Our Responsibility Towards Future Generations -- 1 Introduction -- 2 An Ethics of Responsibility for the Future Generation: The Paradigm of Hans Jonas -- 3 Survival as the Objective of Law: A New Interpretation of Herbert Hart's "Minimum Content of Natural Law"
  • 4 Future of the Species and the Avenue of Transcendence: Tentative Outlines -- Bibliography -- Future Generations in John Rawls, Theory of Justice -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The Problem of the Lack of Reciprocity -- 1.2 The ''Just Saving'' Principle -- 2 Justice Between Generations -- 2.1 The Definition of the Original Position -- 2.2 The Supplementary Motivational Assumption -- 2.3 Rawls, Later Proposed Solution -- 2.4 Hume's, Conditions of Justice Versus Kant 's, Universalization -- 2.5 Extending the Veil of Ignorance to Membership of a Generation -- 3 What Should Actually Be Saved -- 3.1 Weak sustainability -- 3.2 Strong Sustainability -- 4 Implications -- Bibliography -- What Is It Like to Be Unborn? -- 1 Our Common Future: Biodiversity and Biotechnology -- 1.1 Interdependencies -- 1.2 Conflicts -- 1.3 Valuing Biodiversity: A Matter of Justice -- 1.4 Future justice (1): The Intrinsic Value of Natural and Cultural Resources -- 2 Custodians of Biological and Cultural Diversity -- 2.1 Rights of Native People and Farmers Rights -- 2.2 Future justice(2): Rights of Biosocial Communities of Fate -- 3 Representatives of the Unforeseeable Future -- 3.1 Junctions and Disjunctions of Law -- 3.2 Future Justice (3): Protecting Future Generations -- 4 Future Generations as Community of Fate -- 4.1 Morally Unborn and Potential Life -- 4.2 Collective ''Quasi-Personal'' Actors -- 4.3 Variables for Contingent Associations -- 4.4 Useful Fiction for Future Justice -- 5 Consequences for the Future of Law -- 5.1 Biodiversity as an Issue of Future Law -- 5.2 Rights of Biodiversity -- 5.3 Rights of Future Justice -- Bibliography -- Cultural Heritage Preservation and Socio-Environmental Sustainability: Sustainable Development, Human Rights and Citizenship -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Age of Rights and Development
  • 2.1 The Discovery of Underdevelopment and Cultural Homologation -- 2.2 Development -- 2.3 An Integrated Approach to Human Rights and Sustainable Development -- 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage -- 3.1 Cultural Heritage, Social Inclusion and Environment -- 3.2 The Common Heritage of Humanity: The Key to Sustainable Development -- 4 A Problem of Effectiveness or Efficiency -- 5 Human Rights, Sustainable Development and Citizenship -- 6 Final Remarks -- Bibliography -- Part III Law, Economics and Sustainability -- Discounting the Future? -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cost-Benefit Analysis -- 3 Reasons for Discounting -- 3.1 Uncertainty About the Future -- 3.2 Increasing Prosperity -- 3.3 Pure Time Preference -- 3.4 Social Opportunity Costs -- 4 Dispersing the Fog -- 4.1 What Is Discounted? -- 4.2 Opportunity Cost Versus Social Discount Rate -- 4.3 The Real Problem -- 4.4 A Two-Stage Decision-Making Procedure -- 5 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- A Critical Review of È̀fficiency Ethics'' The Case of Climate Economics -- 1 Introduction and Problem Specification -- 2 Realistic Climate Data, Economic Damages and Uncertainties -- 3 The Limits to Growth -- 4 Climate Protection and Justice: Why Natural Science and Preference-Based Decision Theory Cannot Lay Sole Claim to Be Labelled "Objective" - and What "Ethics Within IPCC-Reports" Would Mean -- 4.1 The Core of Sustainable Ethics -- 4.2 A Key Distinction: Anthropology (Homo Economicus) Versus Normative Preference Theory Preference theory/Efficiency Theory -- 4.3 Why the Economic Efficiency Theory (Normative Preference Theory) Is Ethics Itself -- Also on the Concepts of Objectivity and Rationality -- 4.4 Why the Normative Preference Theory Is Not Convincing -- 4.5 The Case for a Theory of Justice Based on Discourse Rationality as a Better Alternative to the Preference Theory
  • 5 The Balancing Processes Efficiency Through Quantifications and Discounting -- 6 Governance: Can M̀̀ore Business Ethics and CSR'' Be Effective Climate Protection Climate protection Instruments? On the Misleading Separation of B̀̀ottom Up'' and T̀̀op Down'' Approaches -- Bibliography -- Valuing the Invaluable Valuation of Human Life in Cost-Efficiency Assessments of Regulatory Interventions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Economic Methods for the Valuation of Human Life -- 2.1 Human-Capital Method -- 2.1.1 Method for Quantifying the Value of Destroyed Human Capital -- 2.1.2 Critical Appraisal of the Human-Capital Method -- 2.2 Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.2.1 Starting Point and Aim of the Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.2.2 Methodology for Determining Willingness to Pay -- 2.2.3 Critical Appraisal of the Willingness-to-Pay Method -- 2.3 Interim Conclusion -- 3 The Moral and Legal Point of View -- 3.1 Permissibility of the Quantitative Valuation of Human Life -- 3.1.1 The Ideal of the Infinite Value of Human Life -- 3.1.2 The Reality of Value and Resource Scarcity-- Or the Normative Force of Actuality -- 3.1.3 Distinction Between Monetary and Normative Value -- 3.2 Permissibility of the Qualitative Valuation of Human Life -- 3.2.1 Differentiation by Age -- 3.2.2 Differentiation by Income -- 3.3 Interim Conclusion -- 4 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index
Control code
UMKCLawddaEBC798895
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (249 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789400718692
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
UMKC Law: DDA record.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC798895
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL798895
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10494479
  • (OCoLC)771213979

Library Locations

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      500 E. 52nd Street, Kansas City, MO, 64110, US
      39.032488 -94.581967
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